Gazette

Awards

April 30, 2017

Andrew Carnegie Fellows

The 35 scholars chosen as 2017 Andrew Carnegie Fellows by the Carnegie Corporation of New York are listed below, along with their project titles. The fellowships, which carry awards of up to $200,000, support research in the social sciences and the humanities.

Daron Acemoglu, a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "Building State Capacity."

Christopher A. Bail, an associate professor of sociology and public policy at Duke University, "Countering Extremist Narratives on Social Media Via Computational Social Science."

David Bromwich, a professor of English at Yale University, "The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke, Volume 2: From Imperial Reform to the French Revolution."

David E. Campbell, a professor of American democracy at the University of Notre Dame, "Godless Politics: The Politics of Secularism in the United States."

David Danks, a professor of philosophy and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University, "Trust in an Age of Autonomous Technologies."

Melissa Dell, an assistant professor of economics and public policy at Harvard University, "The Role of Primary Schooling in Promoting Tolerance, Civic Engagement, and National Unity: Evidence from Indonesia’s Massive School Building Campaign."

Jared Farmer, an associate professor of history at Stony Brook University, "Latest Oldest Living Beings."

Charlotte E. Gill, deputy director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy and an assistant professor of criminology, law, and society at George Mason University, "The Meaning of Community Safety in Appalachian Kentucky."

Cathleen M. Giustino, a professor of history at Auburn University, "Violence and Heritage: Museums, Racism, and Erasure of the Past in Former Eastern Europe."

Stephen G. Gross, an assistant professor of history in the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies at New York University, "Germany’s Energy Revolution: Past, Present, and Lessons for the Future."

Daniel Immerwahr, an assistant professor of history at Northwestern University, "How to Hide an Empire: Power and Territory in the Greater United States."

Sikina Jinnah, an associate professor of politics at the University of California at Santa Cruz, "Global Governance of Climate Engineering: Building an Institutional Framework."

Rucker C. Johnson, an associate professor of public policy at the University of California at Berkeley, "Long-Run Impacts of Early-Life Health and Education Investments."

Nathan J. Kelly, an associate professor of political science at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, "America’s Inequality Trap: How Economic Inequality Reinforces Itself Through Politics."

Mona Lena Krook, an associate professor of political science at Rutgers University at New Brunswick, "Violence Against Women in Politics: A Rising Global Phenomenon."

Katerina Linos, a professor of law at the University of California at Berkeley, "Refugees Misdirected: Information Barriers in the Exercise of Legal Rights."

Lauren M. MacLean, an associate professor of political science at Indiana University at Bloomington, "Climate Change and Energy Poverty in New Democracies: Learning From Ghana’s Success in State-Building and Citizenship."

Monica Muñoz Martinez, an assistant professor of American studies at Brown University, "New Narratives for Reckoning with Histories of Violence."

Cecilia Menjívar, a professor of sociology at the University of Kansas, "The Temporariness of Immigrant Legality: Living in Legal Limbo."

Kristin Michelitch, an assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, "How Can Politicians Be Held Accountable to Perform Their Jobs?"

Gregg A. Mitman, a professor of history of science, medical history, history, and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, "Forgotten Paths of Empire: Firestone and the Promise of Liberia."

Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak, a professor of economics at Yale University, "The Science of Scaling Up Effective Interventions: An Application to Seasonal Poverty."

Diana C. Mutz, a professor of political science and communication at the University of Pennsylvania, "Distance and Democracy: Discouraging Isolationism in an Interconnected World."

Philip M. Napoli, a professor of public policy at Duke University, "Media Technocracy: The Rise of Algorithmic News and the Future of the Marketplace of Ideas."

Gregory F. Nemet, an associate professor of public affairs and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, "How Did Solar Become Inexpensive? An Assessment of Six Global and Local Explanations."

Richard A. Nielsen, an assistant professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "Islamic Authority in the Internet Age."

Atalia Omer, an associate professor of religion, conflict, and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame, "Religion, Gender, and the Practice of Peacebuilding and Development in Mindanao and Malindi."

Polly J. Price, an associate dean of faculty and a professor of law at Emory University, "Governing Disease: Epidemics, Law, and the Challenge of Disease Control in a Democratic Society."

Sean F. Reardon, a professor of poverty and inequality in education at Stanford University, "Opportunity and Education in America."

Emily Ryo, an associate professor of law and sociology at the University of Southern California, "Detention Nation: Immigration Enforcement and the Future of American Democracy."

Lauret Savoy, a professor of environmental studies and geology at Mount Holyoke College, "On the River’s Back: Seeing Roots of an ‘American Dilemma’ in a History of Landscape and Mixed Heritage in the Chesapeake Tidewater and Piedmont."

Andrew D. Selee, executive vice president at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and incoming president of the Migration Policy Institute, "Intimate Strangers: How Mexico Shapes Everyday Life in the United States."

Tommie Shelby, a professor of philosophy and African and African American studies at Harvard University, "Du Bois’s Democratic Vision: Interpretation, Critique, Lessons."

Charles Stewart III, a professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "Assessing the Promise of Election Reform."

Mila Versteeg, a professor of law at the University of Virginia, "Do Constitutional Rights Make A Difference?"