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2016 Digital Humanities Training Opportunities

Last year, I wrote a post rounding up the DH training opportunities as I knew them for the summer of 2015 (and beyond). The 2016 list is quite similar. It includes, as a part of the DH Training Network:

Applications for these are accepted on a rolling basis and scholarships are often available. Another international opportunity, The Summer School in Digital Humanities, hosted by the Stoa Consortium in Bulgaria, will take place between September 5-10.

If you can’t make it to any of these exotic international locals (and Hamilton College), the Office of Digital Humanities at the NEH is also sponsoring a workshop, Doing Digital History, at George Mason hosted by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History in New Media. The applications for the workshop are due March 15th so if you’re interested, get your (relatively simple) application in ASAP. I appreciate that the questions for potential participants include both approaches to and questions about research and teaching.

Also a part of the DH Training Network (and, again, closer to home for many ProfHacker readers) is HILT, taking place from June 13-16th at IUPUI. I will, once again, be facilitating the course in Digital Pedagogy alongside Amanda Licastro (whom I met and bonded with at the very first iteration of HILT when it was known as a “winter institute”). There are also ten other fantastic week-long courses at HILT, all taught by fantastic people.

And finally (although certainly not exhaustively), is the Digital Pedagogy Lab Summer Institute, taking place at University of Mary Washington from August 8-12th. Adeline wrote about (and taught at) the first iteration last year, and this year I have the pleasure of teaching the “Praxis” track. I’m really looking forward to spending the week focusing on strategies for implementing and supporting digital pedagogy approaches in the classroom. There are a limited number of full fellowships available if you apply before March 30th.

As always, if I missed any opportunities, please share them in the comments!

Photo Credit: Sunrise by Murray Bessette

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