All posts by Anastasia Salter


Open Thread Wednesday: Solutions for Tracking Projects

Pretty much everything we do in academic publishing has a deadline, whether it’s the date for an abstract or paper submission to a call for proposals, the next big national grant deadline, a personal goal for a thesis or book manuscript, or a contract from a publisher. Since most of us have multiple (if not dozens, or more!) projects going at once with competing deadlines, keeping track of everything in the pipeline can be a big task. Deadlines on the calendar are helpful, but also often closer…


Crafting for Wellness

With the semester’s end already closer than it appears on the calendar, and the threat of winter (which admittedly in Florida looks a lot like summer) just around the corner, I’m fairly overwhelmed. Whether your workload is getting bogged down by grading, manuscript deadlines, committee work, curriculum revisions, advising, or all of the above, it’s easy to get distracted from wellness. At ProfHacker we write a lot about different strategies for wellness because it deserves a spot on that list …


Making Visual Novels with Ren’Py

In this ongoing series of making games on the classroom, I’ve been taking a look at a number of user-friendly tools for making interactive content, including:

Every tool I’ve examined has different strengths, and ultimately choosing the right tool for your own project or a class assignment can determine its success. I’ve been looking for ways to change up my digital narrative & c…


MLA Commons CORE and Open Access

The Modern Language Association recently announced an exciting open-access project, Humanities Core, funded by the NEH. The project is very ambitious and promises to be a valuable asset for researchers, particularly those without access to the expensive databases of large universities. The announcement explains the project:

The MLA and Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship are pleased to announce that they have been awarded a $60,000 sta…


Virtual Techniques for Co-writing

Over the past year, I’ve found myself involved in more collaborative writing projects. This isn’t really something that came up in my discipline in grad school, where everything I worked on was written alone. These projects are much harder to organize than my solo work: often, they span several platforms, multiple email threads, chats, and files.

I’ve noticed that everyone I work with has a different preference for technologies and strategies. Here are a few I’ve been using, and their advantage…


Student-Centered Design Within an LMS

Last year, I started teaching large online courses for the first time. While teaching online still has a lot of limitations and challenges, I’ve enjoyed approaching it as a design problem, and I’ve been trying to improve my online course materials every semester. Updating material isn’t just a matter of refreshing content: I recommend using each new class as an opportunity to check your organization, clarity, and menu design. Here are a few of the strategies I follow when trying to take a stude…


Open Thread Wednesday: Strategies for Summer-Fall Transitions

This is my last week of summer, despite the fact that Florida heat won’t be going away anytime soon. Depending on your university’s calendar, if you’re on a 9 month contract you might also be staring down the first day of classes or savoring a last few weeks of summer research time. Either way, fall marks a time of transitioning that those of us in academia experience as our own new year’s, usually coming with its own resolutions and regrets. With course prep, syllabus writing, and in some cas…


Weekend Reading: End of Pokemon Summer

With the close of summer comes the end of easy Pokemon hunting on campus: the imminent arrival of students means that gyms professors like me have been momentarily capturing will soon be dominated by high-level dragons. As you prepare for the oncoming semester, here are a few weekend reads:

Celeste Tuong Vy recently shared her job talk on digital humanities and class design, It’s great for both the insights and the model of a job talk:

I’d like to reiterate the value of making explicit resear…


Digital Distractions: Pokemon Go

Last week, Niantic Labs released a new mobile version of Pokemon, Pokemon Go. If you haven’t played one of the many previous Pokemon games on Nintendo consoles, the basic premise is exploring a world to capture and train adorable little monsters for a life of battles. Pokemon Go puts a twist on the model, inviting players to step outside and explore their own world while capturing monsters imposed over camera imagery. This makes for some awesome pictures (and selfies with Pokemon pre-capture) a…


#PulseOrlandoSyllabus: a Crowdsourced Teaching Resource

As a professor at the University of Central Florida, I was glued to Twitter on Sunday following the tragic aftermath of the Orlando shooting during Latinx night at popular gay / GLBTQ nightclub Pulse. Several students and graduates from colleges around the area are on the list of dead, and local campuses (including mine) have been hosting blood drives and vigils in the wake. It’s always difficult to know what to do after this type of event in classes: I pushed back the deadline for assignments …