All posts by Anastasia Salter

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Weekend Reading: Fading Summer Edition


Sundial, Perranporth flickr photo by Tim Green aka atoach shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Summer is moving quickly, especially for those of us with semester start times looming just around the corner in August. This is the time of year when deadlines on the calendar are definitely closer than they appear. I for one have found myself increasingly focused on the calendar, but it’s important to take a break and find time in summer for recovery and reflection. With that in mind, this …

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Open Thread Wednesday: What’s at the Bottom of your To-Do List?

Every few days of summer, I recopy my to-do list to a new page of my notebook (currently, a Moleskine Professional Notebook because I like the page layouts.) Jason wrote about addressing the challenges of unstructured summer time through careful to-do list management previously: he advised making use of regular reminders to keep important tasks in front of you. I’ve written in the past about my preference for physical to-do lists, but I find the very act of recopying is enough reinforcement for…

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Confronting Your Book Collection

While spring cleaning may be traditional, summer cleaning fits better with the academic cycle particularly as it tends to be a time of transitions: whether you are moving to a new institution, a new position, or just switching gears on a writing project, summer is an opportunity for addressing both physical and digital clutter. I’m in the midst of my summer cleaning now, but I’m at the point where things always fall apart: trying to reconcile my fixed set of shelf space with the number of books…

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Thinking Digital with External Review Materials

For many, the academic tenure process begins over the summer. Even if your institution’s internal review process and material submissions seem to be lurking months away in August or September, the process of preparing for and submitting materials for external review is likely already underway or on the summer to-do list. Just picking a list of external reviewers can be a challenge: Nels wrote a great post a few years ago discussing the process of selecting appropriate reviewers, and Karen Kelsk…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Online Class and Virtual Attendance Challenges

Like many of you, I’m in a moment of rapid transition, with spring semester grades barely posted and summer classes already underway. For students who are motivated by their graduation pace, funding, or other needs, summer classes are a great way to move forward: when I was an undergraduate I regularly embraced the format. As a faculty member I have more mixed feelings, particularly with the rising popularity of online summer classes.

This summer I’m revisiting a difficult format that I’ve onl…

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Review: The Interactive Past

I frequently write here about the potential for using games in the classroom, and I’m always on the lookout for interesting transdisciplinary engagement with this idea. So I was excited to see the recent open-access Sidestone Press release of The Interactive Past: Archaeology, Heritage & Video Games edited by Angus A.A. Mol, Csilla E. Ariese-Vandemeulebroucke, Krijn H.J. Boom & Aris Politopoulos. The project is interesting both as an academic approach (it was funded via Kickstarter) and as a co…

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Weekend Reading: Goodbye March Edition

I’ve been exchanging emails with a lot of fellow academics this week and we’ve commiserated over the difficulty of March. Whether you were on spring break or not, there’s something about this month and its placement in the already-fast spring semester that I always find dizzying. Here’s a few links to reading while catching one’s breath this weekend:

  • The University of Guelph Library is making fun use of one of my favorite tools, Twine, for a short interactive experience “Manage Your Research:…

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Switching to Atom for Web Coding

As a web developer I am in many ways a creature of habit: I started making websites back when the “blink” tag was still cool, under construction GIFs were all the rage, and every site declared with images whether it was designed to land on the Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator side of the browser wars. At the time, there weren’t many options of great tools for working with HTML and JavaScript: WYSIWYG, or “what you see is what you get” editors, produced convoluted and messy code if used f…

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Going Digital With Annual Review, Tenure & Promotion Materials

The ubiquitous tenure binder, serving as documentation of one’s academic endeavors, is gradually being replaced by digital processes that involve significantly fewer hours spent on printing and copying. If your university has recently switched over to a digital system, or if you’ve just started at an institution with a digital materials submissions process, you’re probably in a position where you’ve got a lot of papers and files sitting around in need of scanning and organizing. This was my pos…

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Rhizcomics and the Future of Scholarly Forms

RhizcomicsEmblemDRC

Last week, the University of Michigan Press / Gayle Morris Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative launched the open access version of a new book by Jason Helms: Rhizcomics: Rhetoric, Technology, and New Media Composition. The work (as shown above) takes full advantage of its born-digital composition, making use of images, animation, video, and annotation, and it defies a straightforward linear reading by including a range of asides and diversions (as well as a few intentionally intertwined ch…