All posts by George Williams

by

Do Your Students Take Good Notes?

Whether — and how — students take notes in class is an evergreen topic in discussions of teaching and learning. Unfortunately, I often find myself frustrated and annoyed when I’m explaining something in class and look out at a room full of students who are, admittedly, paying attention to what I’m saying but writing down not a single thing in their notes. Frustration and annoyance do not make for good pedagogy, though, and my off-the-cuff comments in response to this particular student behavior…

by

Haiku Deck Introduces “Classroom” Option

Back in June of 2013, I wrote a brief post about Haiku Deck, which at the time was simply a free iPad app for creating and showing presentations. In the last 3 years, Haiku Deck has evolved to include web-hosted presentations (and the ability to create presentation through a web-based interface). Unfortunately, if you want to be able to create more than 3 presentations you’ll now have to pay. The most affordable option is signing up for a “Pro” account for $10 a month (though teachers and stude…

by

LibGuides: Best Use Scenarios?

I’ve always been kind of ambivalent about LibGuides (and similar tools for helping people navigate topics in the library). If you’re not already familiar with LibGuides, here’s a quick definition courtesy of the Library Success wiki: “A LibGuide is a content management and publishing system created by SpringShare. Libraries may use LibGuides to create subject guides, course guides, information portals, or research help pages to name a few.” You can find many examples across a wide range of topi…

by

Re-Thinking Students’ Community Involvement and Education

Recently I’ve been reading about the LEAP (Liberal Arts and America’s Promise) Challenge from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU). Writing in a recent issue of the AACU’s Liberal Education, organization president Carol Gear Schneider explains that “The key concept at the center of the LEAP Challenge is that all college students need to prepare to contribute in a world marked by open or unscripted problems—problems where the right answer is far from known and where sol…

by

How to Store Your Twitter Archive on Github Pages

It’s no secret that here at ProfHacker we’re interested in the ways Twitter can be used in higher education, and one of our favorite tools for working with Twitter is Martin Hawksey’s TAGS, “a free Google Sheet template which lets you setup and run automated collection of search results from Twitter.”

As Mark has written, Something cool you can do with Hawksey’s TAGS is create an automatically updated, publicly viewable archive of all of your Tweets. Mark keeps his archive on GoogleDrive, which…

by

Weekend Reading: Semester Gets Underway Edition

On my campus we just finished the first week of the semester, involving the usual combination of faculty meetings and classes. Whether you’ve also already started or you’re still putting the finishing touches on your semester prep, here are a few readings to consider over the weekend.

Robert Epstein dismantles the “vacuous” idea that the human brain can be understood by considering it a sort of organic computer:

Our shoddy thinking about the brain has deep historical roots, but the invention of…

by

CAST Figuration Seeks to Make Bootstrap More Accessible

Last summer I published a post about learning to use Bootstrap, “a free and open-source collection of tools for creating websites and web applications, [containing] HTML- and CSS-based design templates for typography, forms, buttons, navigation and other interface components, as well as optional JavaScript extensions” (Wikipedia entry on Bootstrap). Bootstrap is an extremely useful, free framework for web developers.

This summer, I was pleased to see the Center for Applied Special Technology (C…

by

Use a Blogging Client as a Backup Method

As you may have read, author Dennis Cooper recently had his blog deleted from Google’s Blogspot platform without adequate explanation. My reaction to this story has been two-fold.

First, for anyone who has been writing online for any length of time, Cooper’s loss of several years’ worth of work is a sobering reminder that trusting your data to an online entity for safekeeping can lead to heartbreak. In situations like this, I would argue, Google needs to step up and provide not only a satisfyin…

by

3 Tips for Getting (and Staying) Fit

Here at ProfHacker we’ve published many posts over the years under the category “Wellness,” which covers a broad range of specific topics from balancing work responsibilities with summer fun to strategies for ensuring you have a good lunch to improving your sleep to which earbuds to wear while swimming.

An important part of wellness is being able to get some exercise, hopefully on a regular basis. Now that we’ve reached the hot summer months here in South Carolina, I’m reminded of how difficult…