All posts by Jason B. Jones

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CFP: Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

change bench

This CFP comes by way of Kirsti Cole, who with Holly Hassel has just published Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership (Routledge, 2017). The CFP is for the followup:

We are proposing this collection because a regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to univer…

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Like Privacy? Try Brave

The swing of a soccer player

Serendipitous discovery is not just for apocryphally wandering through library stacks–sometimes you can stumble across a cool tool, as well. Friday offered just such an occasion: I was working through Moacier P. de Sá Pereira’s The Javascripting English Major (recommended in Weekend Reading), and in the first chapter I discovered a new-to-me-web browser: Brave.

Brave is a recent-ish browser (1.0 release last year), developed by a team led by Brendan Eich (who invented JavaScript) and Brian Bond…

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Weekend Reading: Let’s Just Hold It Together Please

chain and a rope tied together

I hope everyone has a safe weekend, and one that’s as relaxing or rewarding as possible. Let’s get right to the links:

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The Dark Truth of Email Tips

The poet who couldn't write poetry

Once again, xkcd has gotten pretty directly at the truth of those of us with email struggles:


Merlin Mann has always suggested that people focused on the wrong parts of his somewhere-between-legendary-and-notorious “Inbox Zero” talk–that it was always about the psychology of email triage as much as tips and tricks for getting through email faster.

Photo probably “The Poet Who Couldn’t Write Poetry” (“Image from page 173 of ‘St. Nicholas’ (1873)”) by Flickr user Internet Archive Book Images /

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Checklists in Late Summer

graffiti of checklist

It seems harsh to call it “late summer” when it’s not even quite August yet, but there it is. At some point, items related to the fall semester will start to move to the forefront of one’s mind, even as one’s trying to wrap up summer projects, vanish for a vacation, or just try to keep up with who’s the White House communications director.

Checklists can help keep track of things, especially at such transitional moments. (See Heather’s checklist for a new semester as an example.)

Last week, Gab…

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Fight the Fear/Procrastination Cycle With Small Tasks

inward spiral
I learned this weekend that, in the northern hemisphere, July 22 is typically the date where temperatures start trending down for the year. In addition to the obvious Game of Thrones joke, it means that there’s more or less no getting around the fact that summer is passing quickly, along with the more grandiose ambitions found in one’s summer project list.

With that in mind, I wanted to link to Jenni Berrett’s post on perfectionism, “You Aren’t Lazy–You’re Just Terrified: On Paralysis and Perfe…

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Turning Your iPhone’s Camera into an Assistive Device: Seeing AI

safety goggles with judgey eyes drawn on
Earlier this week, Microsoft released a fascinating app for iOS devices, called Seeing AI. Seeing AI is an app that lets users take pictures of the world around them, and then it uses the iPhone’s on-phone intelligence to describe what’s in the picture. It’s designed as an app for people with low vision, but even if that description doesn’t apply to you at the minute, using it makes for a provocative way of thinking about the way these devices will be mediating the world around us, especially i…

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Turn Twitter Threads into Shareable Posts with Spooler

Photo of spool with several thread colors

One of the most delightful occurrences on the internet is when someone writes a little script or web app or bot to solve one of your pet peeves. Not only does it scratch your not-very-important-but-still-irritating itch, but it makes it seem like you’re not alone. “See?!? Someone else found this irritating!”

Darius Kazemi‘s Spooler is just such a service, which solves a simple, recently emergent problem: sharing sequences of interconnected tweets. How do you share Twitter threads (or, god help …

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An Easy macOS Script for Converting Images to PDFs

a sheaf of contracts

One of the great conveniences about modern smartphone cameras is that it’s now much easier to submit paperwork of various types. Even if you don’t have a digital copy of the form, you can frequently fill it out, take a picture, and send the photo a long.

Except, as David Sparks explains in this handy post, it’s not quite that easy: images aren’t great to work with, and need to be converted to PDFs. And they typically have a lot of extraneous information, such as color. macOS has a variety of t…

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Marking up Mobile Photos with Annotable

annotations
Ever since Evernote abandoned Skitch a couple of years ago, I’ve been looking for a good way to mark up photos on my phone, which is a thing I find myself doing pretty regularly, either in documenting issues around campus, or communicating quickly about various issues.. I’ve tried a variety of different apps, but haven’t found one that’s really stuck.

I’d tried Annotable before, but it fell into the “interesting, but maybe not for me” category. Last month, though, Ling Wang released a new vers…