Category Archives: Editorial

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Weekend Reading: Searching for Hope Edition

fire

I am terrified of fire. I still wake up from nightmares of burning, and when I was a kid, I used to wake from these nightmares and have to go through the entire house ensuring that nothing, in fact, was at risk of catching fire.

In response, I learned all I could about fire, particularly how to do a pretty good campfire. I know how to get it started (with a reliable match or lighter; I’m not that fancy), know how to keep it going, know how to effectively put it out. I’ve sufficiently impres…

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Weekend Reading: Post-Election Classroom Resources

The end of the semester is approaching slowly, and the holiday season is almost upon us. I for one am overwhelmed, and focusing a lot on working consistently in short bursts with dedicated time for wellness. But as we look towards next semester, here are a few readings and resources that might provide inspiration:

  • The Trump Syllabus 2.0 by N. D. B. Connolly and Keisha N. Blain is an impressive collection of readings grouped by weekly themes, syllabus-style. Each week addresses a larger issue …

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Stop The Spread of Fake News

Mark Zuckerburg might think that fake news on Facebook didn’t sway the election, but Associate Professor Zeynep Tufekci (and many others) aren’t buying it. In a piece for the New York Times (where she is a regular contributor and a must-read), Tufekci writes:

He is also contradicting Facebook’s own research.

In 2010, researchers working with Facebook conducted an experiment on 61 million users in the United States right before the midterm elections. One group was shown a “go vote” message…

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Open Thread: Start Thinking About Next Semester

Now that many of us are at the mid-point of the semester — Wait! How did that happen? — it’s a good time to take stock of how things are going this semester and consider what we might want next semester to be like. What lessons have you learned? Do you want to do some things differently? Do you need to make room by letting go of (or throwing out) certain things?

Please share your thoughts (and plans) in the comments.

[CC-licensed Flickr photo by Robert Couse Baker]

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Five Things That Helped Us Survive Summer 2016

You don’t have to be Stephen Merrit to know that summer is coming to a close, so it’s about time for us to tell you about five things that helped us survive summer. Here at ProfHacker, we have a tradition of sometimes sharing a few of our favorite things in a collaboratively-authored post. (Check out our 2014, 2011, and 2010 Things That Helped Us Survive Summer posts, too.)

Maha

  1. Solar Charger: at the eLearning Africa conference, someone gifted me with a solar charger. It needs to  be charged…

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Weekend Reading: Semester Gets Underway Edition

On my campus we just finished the first week of the semester, involving the usual combination of faculty meetings and classes. Whether you’ve also already started or you’re still putting the finishing touches on your semester prep, here are a few readings to consider over the weekend.

Robert Epstein dismantles the “vacuous” idea that the human brain can be understood by considering it a sort of organic computer:

Our shoddy thinking about the brain has deep historical roots, but the invention of…

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From the Archives: Preparing for the New Semester

classroom

It’s that time again . . .  here are some tips from the ProfHacker archives.

Designing/Revising Your Syllabi

If you’ve only got a few minutes, check out 11 Fast Syllabus Hacks for useful updates to your course documents.

Konrad’s Citing Syllabi suggests some best practices for citing the work of other instructors whose syllabi you’ve consulted and for ensuring your own syllabus can be shared and remixed if that’s your intent.

Jason’s Creative Approaches to the Syllabus provides links to a numbe…

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Weekend Reading: End of Pokemon Summer

With the close of summer comes the end of easy Pokemon hunting on campus: the imminent arrival of students means that gyms professors like me have been momentarily capturing will soon be dominated by high-level dragons. As you prepare for the oncoming semester, here are a few weekend reads:

Celeste Tuong Vy recently shared her job talk on digital humanities and class design, It’s great for both the insights and the model of a job talk:

I’d like to reiterate the value of making explicit resear…