Category Archives: Productivity

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Annotating Financial Context Automatically with Bloomberg Lens

calculator with financial forms
Despite the fact that the web is a powerful tool for annotation, many news stories and blog posts lack relevant context that would be useful for readers. Especially as a site ages, it can be hard to know how information has changed over time.

Most of us at ProfHacker like hypothes.is as an annotate-everywhere tool. But there are other visions of annotation, and this week, Bloomberg and Postlight jointly announced Bloomberg Lens, an iOS app and Chrome extension that aims to provide on-the-fly f…

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Laptop Ban? Things You Can Do With Just a Smartphone

children looking at a smartphone together

I recently had a conference in London, and I was flying I direct from Cairo. The laptop ban on this route came into effect shortly before my trip and it would have been really inconvenient for me to re-route. I also heard it’s quite risky to check your laptop in the luggage (you risk theft, damage, or at least loss – until the airlines can guarantee these things won’t happen, I won’t check my laptop or iPad in checked luggage). I recently (before the laptop/iPad ban) contributed a light-hea…

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Supermute Twitter

Start or Stop

I’ve been talking a lot about Twitter lately here on ProfHacker, but it’s still one of my favorite places to be online. However, sometimes, I don’t want to see certain things in my timeline. Certainly you can use the Mute function on Twitter, but why use a subtle, flexible, and complex tool when you can use a blunt instrument?

Enter Supermute:

Supermute is a blunt tool. You can define any phrase you’d like to mute for up to 7 days. During that time period, if anyone in your timeline (including …

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End of the Semester: Make a List

3166085824_d93fe8c5c5_b

Here on my campus, we have only 3 weeks of regular class meetings left. I don’t know about you, but the end seems to come more quickly every semester! The more experienced I get the less chaotic these few weeks feel to me, but I still have to work at it to stay organized and to look ahead to what lies beyond the semester’s end.

Back in December of 2009, Ethan wrote up some advice explaining his own end-of-semester checklist. Here’s the overview:

  • Backup my course websites

  • Update my CV

  • Writ…

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New Resource on Open Access, Pedagogy, Learning

The concept of “Open,” particularly when it comes to Open Access, is something that we’ve written a lot about here at Profhacker. In fact one could make the argument that part of our Ethos here is build around the idea of openness; we write openly about our pedagogies, our practices, and our struggles. Increasingly, however, “open” is being turned into the latest buzzword around education and education reform (transformation, disruption, revolutionize, leveraging, etc). The word, then, is losin…

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Save That Hashtag! Twitter Recorder Extension

Got Hash Tag?

We’ve written about Twitter a lot here at ProfHacker. One of the best ways to archive tweets, particularly around a particular search term or hashtag is Martin Hawksey’s TAGS archive, which George recently wrote about. But the TAGS archive works best if you already know you want to archive a hashtag or search term; the archives can only go as far back as the Twitter API will allow, which isn’t all the way back.

I ran into this problem when I wanted to go back and collect all of the #FYCchat arc…

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Writing a Better Conference Abstract

conference badges

Ah, spring–when it’s time to start securing next winter’s conference plans, usually by pulling together abstracts in response to various Calls for Papers. We’ve written a fair amount on conferences in the past, of course, with Erin in particular offering a helpful tactical approach to “The Conference Abstract”.

Today, Catherine Baker does everyone a terrific service by breaking down, in specific detail, “Ho…

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Digital Humanities Training Opportunities and Challenges

Digital Lock

For the past two years, right around this time, I’ve compiled a post gathering the various Digital Humanities training opportunities that take place during the summer months (2015, 2016). This year, Katherine D. Harris beat me to it on her blog. One thing that that becomes clear, as Katherine notes, is that although there are many opportunities, many of them are either not geared towards beginners in digital humanities or are prohibitively expensive for most faculty:

So, we need something low c…

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Culling Your Social Media Past

Picture of a Delete Key

Last week, I wrote about data security when crossing the border, and my own…unease about my upcoming trip to Canada (and subsequent re-entry). One of the challenges, however, is that much of my social media is pretty wide open and easily accessible through a google search of my uncommon name.

Recently, my colleague Kris Shaffer began an experiment in digital minimalism. He wrote a post last week on deleting a large swath of his Twitter history based on Tweepy in Python. His step-by-step instruc…

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Why The Open Keynote Is Still Open

dome with open top

“Is your keynote ready yet?” asks my mom, about my upcoming keynote at OER17. She never used to check if I finished my homework at school, and of course she knew NEVER to ask about my progress on my PhD dissertation back when. This one’s caught her attention, though. And no, it’s not “done” yet for several reasons. And I wanted to share these here on Prof Hacker because I thought it might have relevance beyond my personal experience, and to ask how other people’s keynote processes were (includi…