Category Archives: Profession

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Discriminatory Design in Education and Educational Technology

Anti-homeless bench with armrests

Twice this week I have seen images of these benches. Public benches that have dividers or armrests. These are what Mike Caulfield called “hostile design” because they implicitly prevent homeless people from sleeping on these benches and therefore pass on a social message and enforce particular behavior. Ruha Benjamin in her ISTE 2016 keynote called it something I find more accurate: discriminatory design. Because we all recognize that the design is not hostile to everyone. It is only hostile to…

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Considerate Collaboration: Google Docs

Bee about to land on flower

A large portion of the work I do exists on Google Docs – whether working on internal documents within my department, for committees, within my classes, or collaborating online to co-author articles, organize events, or provide feedback to other writers. Over time, I realized that just because many people can use Google Docs does not mean they are always considerate in the ways they collaborate on Google Docs. Here are some tips on some areas I feel collaborators (whether peers, or teacher/stude…

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Using Video and Audio to Share Our Scholarship

person listening to headphones

 

[This is a guest post by George Veletsianos, Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology and an associate professor at Royal Roads University, where he teaches in the MA in Learning and Technology program, and researches networked scholarship and digital learning. He blogs at http://www.veletsianos.com and you can follow him on Twitter @veletsianos.--@JBJ]

I use an eclectic assortment of learning resources in my courses. Books, peer-reviewed journal articles, op-eds, white pap…

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Self as OER

sky with wispy clouds

This post is co-authored with Suzan Koseoglu (@suzankoseoglu) who is an academic developer at the Teaching and Learning Innovation Centre at Goldsmiths, University of London. Suzan has recently defended her doctoral dissertation on open participants’ experiences in a massive open online course. You can read it here!

This post is based on a presentation Suzan and Maha gave this year at the OER16 conference in Edinburgh. Slideshare available here.

…the true benefit of the academy is the interacti…

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Open Thread Wednesday: Strategies for Summer-Fall Transitions


This is my last week of summer, despite the fact that Florida heat won’t be going away anytime soon. Depending on your university’s calendar, if you’re on a 9 month contract you might also be staring down the first day of classes or savoring a last few weeks of summer research time. Either way, fall marks a time of transitioning that those of us in academia experience as our own new year’s, usually coming with its own resolutions and regrets. With course prep, syllabus writing, and in some cas…

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Two Great Tools for the Timezone-Challenged from World Time Buddy

clock distorted

Others on Prof Hacker have written on how to easily schedule meetings across timezones, including use of Google calendar for scheduling. but for someone like me who is constantly scheduling things with people on different timezones and also wanting to share livestreams with others, there are two tools I rely on pretty heavily.

1. World Time Buddy mobile app

The link to downloading the app is: https://www.worldtimebuddy.com/mobile-app. According to their website, the app helps you “visually conv…

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Plain Language and Inclusive Document Design

bright colorful tree and fields

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking this month about making teaching documents of all kinds more accessible. Some of this is about a syllabus, but some of it is about rethinking some of our signs and documentation at work, as well as ways that we can make our edX courses more accessible to that highly varied audience. So I was delighted to discover an excellent new article on In the Library with the Lead Pipe by Jennifer Turner & Jessica Schomberg on “Inclusivity, Gestalt Principles, and Plain La…

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Preparing for the Press: How to Talk to Reporters

LEGO female scientist

Academics and journalists often have an uneasy relationship. Academics love nuance and writing for experts; journalists tend to value a clear, comprehensible story. And while most academics would be thrilled if more people heard about their work, nobody wants to be at the heart of a political controversy–especially when untenured. (And it’s not just faculty who are unhappy about the press–when I was on the AAUP’s Collective Bargaining Congress, one of the things we learned is that the threat of…

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Choosing Professional Development Events – And My Pick for This Summer

people sitting around a table talking with laptopsI don’t know about you, but most people I know have limited funds and time to spare for onsite professional development events. Many of us have these choices made for us by our managers or by the limitations of our funding or travel ability (see my post about my one day in Rome!). At one point in my life, I only went to conferences near Sheffield UK in the summer because that was when I went to England to meet my supervisor. More recently, I only go to conferences in nearby countries where I can…

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Software that Supports Multilingual Dialogue

If you are reading this, chances are, you understand English. Do we realize how much of our online interactions are in English, and how much we are missing of who and what lives on the internet that is not speaking/writing English?

I had a recent interaction on Twitter with Juan Domingo Farnos (@Juandoming) and a few other people, in which Juan responded to all of our English tweets in Spanish, and Twitter on my phone had a quick translate link (this uses Bing). This conversation was a little s…