Category Archives: Profession


Open Access Week 2016 Starts Today

Once again, it’s the time of year for Open Access Week, a coordinated worldwide effort to make Open Access “a new norm in scholarship and research.” Check out the Open Access Week site for a schedule of events taking place worldwide, a variety of blog posts, a selection of videos, and some ideas for how to get involved (at the bottom of this page). If you’re on Twitter, look for the #OAWeek2016 hashtag.

Is your campus hosting any Open Access Week events? Is this an important issue for you, your…


What We Learned from Co-Teaching

Mountain Prairie reflection

[This post is co-authored with my colleagues, Hoda Mostafa (@hodamost), Associate Director of the Center for Learning and Teaching, American University in Cairo and Sherif Osman (@the_sosman), senior officer, pedagogy and assessment at the Center for Learning and Teaching, American University in Cairo]

Co-teaching means sharing your students, sharing your resources and sharing the joys and challenges of each step of the learning. The authors of this article have co-taught courses and workshops …


Toward Carbon-Neutral, Equitable Conferences

UCSB campus


Following up on one aspect of Maha’s post yesterday on “fostering permeability in academia”, I wanted to point to “A Nearly Carbon-Neutral Conference Model: White Paper/Practical Guide,” published by the Environmental Humanities Initiative at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

The White Paper lays out the environmental and accessibility costs of conferences. The authors compare the impact of flying participants in and of streaming video, they evaluate the financial feasibility of co…


Fostering Permeability in Academia

stack of colorful...beanbags with smiley faces?

“Equality is not a credential. Equality is a task. It is what we have to do, because we are not there yet” - Sara Ahmed

“…universities often describe their missions by drawing on the languages of diversity as well as equality. But using the language does not translate into creating diverse or equal environments. This “not translation” is something we experience: it is a gap between a symbolic commitment and a lived reality.” – Sara Ahmed

I am currently reading a book entitled Presumed Incompete…


How Twitter Changed My Life

One evening last week, while watching hockey (HOCKEY IS BACK) and scrolling though twitter, I noticed a hashtag that had started to trend: #HowTwitterHasChangedMyLife. Of course, the hashtag was filled with funny and nonsensical, and more than a little sarcastic, tweets, but if it’s crossing my field of vision, it means those associated with higher education have discovered it.

Going through the hashtag, it’s amazing to see how many friendships and relationships have been formed over the social …


Getting Long-lasting Effects from the Shortest Talks #2016DML

rushing through a tube station

I wasn’t at #2016DML this year, but I participated via Virtually Connecting (a presentation of ours and three rich hallway conversations – all available here) and watched some of the live/recorded sessions (keynotes and Ignite talks playlist here).

This isn’t the first year DML had this Ignite talk format (also sometimes called lightning talks, they’re very brief time-limited talks where presenters follow one another without pause for Q&A), and other events have done them (e.g. (OLCInnovate had…


MLA Commons CORE and Open Access

The Modern Language Association recently announced an exciting open-access project, Humanities Core, funded by the NEH. The project is very ambitious and promises to be a valuable asset for researchers, particularly those without access to the expensive databases of large universities. The announcement explains the project:

The MLA and Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship are pleased to announce that they have been awarded a $60,000 sta…


Discriminatory Design in Education and Educational Technology

Anti-homeless bench with armrests

Twice this week I have seen images of these benches. Public benches that have dividers or armrests. These are what Mike Caulfield called “hostile design” because they implicitly prevent homeless people from sleeping on these benches and therefore pass on a social message and enforce particular behavior. Ruha Benjamin in her ISTE 2016 keynote called it something I find more accurate: discriminatory design. Because we all recognize that the design is not hostile to everyone. It is only hostile to…


Considerate Collaboration: Google Docs

Bee about to land on flower

A large portion of the work I do exists on Google Docs – whether working on internal documents within my department, for committees, within my classes, or collaborating online to co-author articles, organize events, or provide feedback to other writers. Over time, I realized that just because many people can use Google Docs does not mean they are always considerate in the ways they collaborate on Google Docs. Here are some tips on some areas I feel collaborators (whether peers, or teacher/stude…


Using Video and Audio to Share Our Scholarship

person listening to headphones


[This is a guest post by George Veletsianos, Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology and an associate professor at Royal Roads University, where he teaches in the MA in Learning and Technology program, and researches networked scholarship and digital learning. He blogs at and you can follow him on Twitter @veletsianos.--@JBJ]

I use an eclectic assortment of learning resources in my courses. Books, peer-reviewed journal articles, op-eds, white pap…