Category Archives: Software

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How to Simplify Flickr Photo Attribution

We’ve long been fans of Flickr here at ProfHacker. For example, it’s where we get most of the lead images for our posts and we’ve recommended using Flickr photos to make better slides for presentations. A great feature of Flickr is the wealth of images that have been licensed for re-use — thank you, Creative Commons! — but many people will re-use the Flickr images they find without providing the necessary attribution. This is not cool (and often a violation of the license under which the image …

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Alternatives to Storify (Revisited)

Over six years ago, Ryan first introduced ProfHacker readers to Storify, an online tool for curating information from a variety of sources and presenting it to your audience in a user-friendly format. I’ve enjoyed using Storify over the years, but it has it’s problems.

For example, back in October of 2012 I wrote about a Storify problem encountered by my students that prompted us to generate this list of alternative web services that function similarly to Storify. Although this was a useful exe…

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Using Text Analysis to Discover Work in JSTOR

grounds in coffee

JSTOR have just announced the JSTOR Labs Text Analyzer, a clever tool–still in Beta–that will analyze any document you upload (or text that you copy and paste) and find suggested matches in the JSTOR archives. It’s an interesting proposition–if you click that link on a phone, you can even take a picture of text and the Analyzer will process that.

You can find out more about how it works at this link, but I thought it would be fun to run it through a paper I published a while back. The paper was…

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Data Security and International Travel

I just found out that I’ve been accepted to present at this summer’s Digital Humanities Conference in Montreal. I’m really excited to be able to talk about the Digital Liberal Arts and Infrastructure, as well as the opportunity to be able to go back to Montreal, where I’m from. Except this year, going “home” isn’t going to be as simple.

We’ve written before here on ProfHacker on securing out data, but our most secure passwords won’t protect you if you are required to hand over said passwords …

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Cemmento Addresses the Problem of Preserving Digital Annotations

Here at ProfHacker, we’re interested in digital tools for annotation. Over the years our authors have covered such tools as Google SideWiki, CommentPress and digress.it, Reframe It and Diigo, Scrible, and Hypothes.is. And as the comments to this post asking “How Do You Annotate in Your Class?” reveal, our readers are very interested in digital tools for annotation, too.

One sticking point with such tools, however, is that the annotations that are made on a published online may become useless if…

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Firefox Focus Browser Provides Privacy and Content Blocking

For a few months now I’ve been intermittently using Firefox Focus to browse the web on my iPhone. It’s a free web browser for iOS, created by the Mozilla Foundation, the same folks behind the Firefox browser. What makes Firefox Focus different, however, is the fact that it’s designed to be “a dedicated privacy browser with tracking protection and content blocking.

In other words, if you don’t want your Amazon shopping history (to cite one potential scenario) being communicated to the other webs…

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Archiving Information in a Digital Age

The Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” is an essential resource for anyone who wants to find information that used to be available online but that has disappeared or to find how a particular webpage has changed over time, perhaps because information was deleted or added. (The Wayback Machine is also quite useful for many other reasons.)

Recently, a number of easy-to-use tools have appeared that make it easier to find information in the Internet Archive or to save current information into the …

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Managing Recipes with Paprika

Chopped paprika vegetablesA long time ago here at ProfHacker, we used to run a series titled “What’s for Lunch?” That series prompted me to start keeping track of favorite recipes.

Since I was already a heavy user of Evernote, it became my preferred tool for storing recipes. I’d just use the web clipper to send recipes to my Evernote account, then use the Evernote Food app to access my recipes. The app ignored all notes that didn’t contain recipes, and it looked great. It also allowed users to search several recipe sites…

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Collecting Student Work with Google Forms

File folders organized in a file boxA good number of us here at ProfHacker prefer to avoid paper whenever possible. When I teach my writing course each fall, I have my students use Google Documents so that it’s easy to see an essay’s development over time.

For classes where it’s not essential that I see a student’s revisions, I prefer that essays be submitted in PDF format, so that I can comment on essays using my iPad. (My current favorite app for this purpose is PDFExpert; Jason and Erin have both made use of iAnnotate.)

What I…

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Build a Habit Streak With Productive

graffiti of habit

Jerry Seinfeld has a well-known piece of productivity advice known as “don’t break the chain.” The idea is simple: you visibly mark on a calendar every day you perform some task–write a good joke, work on squats, write toward an article, learn TEI, whatever–and make sure you do it for several consecutive days. Then, you rely on the power of momentum: just don’t break the chain of days. Keep the streak going, and you will build a habit of prioritizing what’s really important–such as your academi…