Category Archives: Software

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What’s your favorite note-taking app?

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Many of us these days use a tablet for taking notes — and for a lot of us, that tablet is an iPad. We’ve explored some note-taking apps for the iPad before:

I’ve also tried two other applications over the last fe…

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6 More Games for After the Election


Earlier this month, I shared six games for facilitating conversations in the wake of the US presidential election. Several designers and educators reached out to share other suggestions, particularly for related political discourse that may be relevant over the coming months. All of these games are free unless otherwise noted, but many of the designers accept donations to support their practice.

  • Jana Reinhardt’s strangely escapist game Solitude (2 dollars to play) is a beautiful metaphorical …

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Are You on Mastodon Yet? Social Network of Our Own

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Have you heard of Mastodon.social? Several of the edtech/digped people started appearing there over Thanksgiving weekend, thanks in part to this article, touting Mastodon as the open source alternative to Twitter. According to their “About” page:

“Mastodon is a free, open-source social network server. A decentralized alternative to commercial platforms, it avoids the risks of a single company monopolizing your communication. Anyone can run Mastodon and participate in the social network seamle…

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Quick photo scanning: Google PhotoScan

Flatbed scanner and photoA good number of us here at ProfHacker try to minimize some of the clutter in our lives by (when possible) digitizing the paper that comes our way.

As we’ve found our way with scanning, we’ve shared what we’ve learned with readers. We’ve reviewed portable scanners such as the Doxie One, and taken a look at phone applications that can be used for document scanning (see, for instance, Lincoln’s post on DocScanner, or Natalie’s on CamScanner).

Those applications are good for working with text docum…

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Filenames and LaTeX and Pandoc, oh my!

Command-line arguments for batch-converting files from docx to pdfSometimes it happens: someone sends us a document in Word format, and we’d really rather it was a PDF. The reasons can vary. Maybe we need to post it on a website, and we’d rather users be able to view it in a browser, rather than being forced to download it. Maybe it’s an essay we need to grade, and, like Erin, we want to use iAnnotate or a similar application for that purpose.

When there are only a few documents involved, converting the files to PDF is simple enough; all that’s necessary is …

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6 Games for Talking About the Election

In the wake of the US presidential election, many of us are deciding what comes next in our classrooms and scholarship. There are no easy answers to this question, and the national divisions are echoed on campus with consequences we are only beginning to understand. However, if you do plan to address these topics in your classroom, games can provide a potentially less threatening opening for sharing experiences. Here are a few games with topics and commentary relevant to the election and curre…

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New Version of Omeka Released

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Here at ProfHacker, we’re fans of Omeka, the content management system for scholarly projects (from the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. See, for example, Julie Meloni’s “A Brief Introduction to Omeka,” Jeffrey McClurken’s “Teaching with Omeka” and “Omeka.net Beta Launches,” Konrad Lawson’s “Omeka 2.0 Is Here” and “Add Space and Time to Your Omeka Exhibits.”

Well, now we learn from a recent announcement by Sharon Leon that there’s a new version of Omeka available: Omeka S. So wh…

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The Latest from Digital Humanities Questions and Answers

Launched in September of 2010, Digital Humanities Questions & Answers is a joint venture of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and ProfHacker. (See Julie Meloni’s launch announcement.)

Digital Humanities Questions and Answers (@DHAnswers on Twitter) is designed to be a free resource where anyone with an interest in the digital humanities can pose a question to the community of folks working in the field.

Since we last checked in with the site, many interesting threads have b…

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Managing and delegating tasks with Nozbe

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Keeping track of tasks seems to be a constant challenge for academics, and over the last several years we’ve certainly written about a lot of task management tools. There are a lot of possibilities out there: Wunderlist (a favorite of many ProfHackers), Things, ToDoist, Remember the Milk, and others.

This post adds yet another possibility to the mix: Nozbe. It’s available on the web, and for just about every platform imaginable: Mac, Windows, Linux, Android, and iOS. It won’t turn up in the…

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Write Collaboratively with Authorea

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Authorea is a new online platform for collaborative academic writing with features that will particularly appeal to scientific and technical users. We’ve written before at ProfHacker about Markdown, LaTeX, Git, version control, and collaboration; Authorea is located at the intersection of those tools and topics.

Upon creating your account, you are asked “How do you normally write documents?” with MSWord, LaTeX, and Markdown as the three choices. (You can change your default user setting, or cha…