Category Archives: Teaching

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Taking Over a Class Mid-Semester

Rhino on the River

This week, because a colleague is leaving*, I’ll be taking on her role in two classes. In both instances I’ll become the instructor of record, although one of the classes is team-taught, so I won’t be fully “taking over.” I’ve done this before, as once in graduate school I taught the final two months or so of a seminar.

It’s a thing that happens more often than one might think, due to the vicissitudes of life, and so I thought I’d gather a few thoughts on how to make the transition work smoothl…

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Collaborative Annotations You May Want to Join

woman and 2 kids read on couch

I am always on the lookout for collaborative hypothes.is annotations – articles or sites out there that others have put out calls to annotate. I do this for three reasons:

  1. I can use them as examples in workshops I give to faculty about annotation, and I noticed my colleague use them in individual consultations with faculty to showcase the tool;
  2. I like to use them in my class so my students get to see the global potential of collaborative annotation; and
  3. For my own professional development – I …
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On Digital Humanities in the Undergraduate Classroom

photo of a circuit board

Readers who are digital humanities-curious–or who are just looking for a decently comprehensive overview of some approaches to digital pedagogy, especially but not necessarily exclusively, in the humanities classroom, might want to bookmark issue 11.3 (out in preview now) of Digital Humanities Quarterly, which is devoted to “Imagining the DH Undergraduate.”

In their “Introduction,”, Emily Christina Murphy and Shannon R Smith note the three themes that connect the essays: student agency, (digita…

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How to Make Short-Form Videos as Tutorials, and Why You Might Want To

Miffy Lamp at night
If Cindy Craig were an on-trend technology company, she would describe her work as “microlearning.” Mercifully, because she’s a librarian, she talks instead about making short-form video (<15 seconds) as a happy medium between the unwatched screencast and tutorials with static screenshots.

Craig has a splendid new essay up in In the Library with the Lead Pipe, called “Modular Short Form Video for Library Instruction”; …

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Using Digital Archives to Teach Data Set Creation and Visualization Design

screenshot of Visual Haggard home page

Kate Holterhoff @KateHolterhoff is a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research areas include nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century British literature, visual culture, digital humanities, and the history of science. She directs and edits the literary and art historical resource VisualHaggard.org, which has recently become a federated archive with with NINES, the Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship.

Useful as d…

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Reasons to Open Source Your Syllabus


The Open Source Renaissance flickr photo by opensourceway shared under a Creative Commons (BY-SA) license

This semester I’m teaching a new graduate course prep. I always enjoy putting together a new syllabus, but graduate courses are particularly exciting: I always have more things I want to teach than can possibly fit into a semester. During my summer planning, I read and reread articles and gather possible materials, and consult the best reference of all: everybody else’s syllabus.

When I fi…

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Tell a Story with your Data with StorylineJS

pietro-jeng-266017

Knight Lab has done it again. Creators of the popular tool TimelineJS and StoryMap have just introduced StorylineJS, which allows you to essentially annotate a data set.

As described in the announcement from Knight Lab,

StorylineJS makes it easy to tell the story behind a dataset, without the need for programming or data visualization expertise. Just upload your data to Google Sheets, add two columns, and fill in the story on the rows you want to highlight. Set a few configuration options and …

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Open-Thread Wednesday: After the Hurricane

If you were in the extensive path of Irma, like I was, then this week has probably changed drastically from what you imagined when you wrote this semester’s syllabus. My campus has been closed for classes since last Thursday, and won’t re-open for students until next Monday. In the great scheme of the impact of a tremendous storm like this one (or Harvey), the loss of instructional time is relatively minor, but it will present challenges for all of us faculty looking ahead to meet the learning …

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From the Archives: Starting a New Semester

seminar table

Whether you’ve already been in the classroom for a week or two, or will be heading back in September, the ProfHacker archives are full of helpful tips to start the new semester off right. Here I mention several of our back to school roundup posts, highlighting just a few of the many links each contains.

The posts linked in From the Archives: Creating Syllabi (2014) focus on the basics of syllabus creation, including technology policies, accessibility, syllabus design, and our ever-popular 11 Fa…

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What First Years Might Not Know & What To Do About It

College Hall sign

[This is a guest post (actually, a collated series of tweets, by Anne Trubek. Trubek is Director of Belt Publishing and author of The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting--and, to her points below, a former associate professor at Oberlin College.]

Teaching first-years today? Here are some things my son, starting college today, was never taught:

  1. How to address professors–Dr., Mr, Mrs., Miss, Ms., first name. Don’t get huffy if your students don’t know either. Teach them.
  2. How to ‘read’…