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From the Archives: Preparing for the New Semester

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It’s that time again . . .  here are some tips from the ProfHacker archives.

Designing/Revising Your Syllabi

If you’ve only got a few minutes, check out 11 Fast Syllabus Hacks for useful updates to your course documents.

Konrad’s Citing Syllabi suggests some best practices for citing the work of other instructors whose syllabi you’ve consulted and for ensuring your own syllabus can be shared and remixed if that’s your intent.

Jason’s Creative Approaches to the Syllabus provides links to a numbe…

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CAST Figuration Seeks to Make Bootstrap More Accessible

Last summer I published a post about learning to use Bootstrap, “a free and open-source collection of tools for creating websites and web applications, [containing] HTML- and CSS-based design templates for typography, forms, buttons, navigation and other interface components, as well as optional JavaScript extensions” (Wikipedia entry on Bootstrap). Bootstrap is an extremely useful, free framework for web developers.

This summer, I was pleased to see the Center for Applied Special Technology (C…

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Weekend Reading: End of Pokemon Summer

With the close of summer comes the end of easy Pokemon hunting on campus: the imminent arrival of students means that gyms professors like me have been momentarily capturing will soon be dominated by high-level dragons. As you prepare for the oncoming semester, here are a few weekend reads:

Celeste Tuong Vy recently shared her job talk on digital humanities and class design, It’s great for both the insights and the model of a job talk:

I’d like to reiterate the value of making explicit resear…

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Switching from Evernote to OneNote, part 1

Book with notes flagged on pagesLast month, Jason alerted readers to Evernote’s recent price hike. It’s a hefty increase (for Premium users, from $49.99/year to $69.99).

I’m a longtime user of Evernote, and have found it very powerful for organizing information and locating it quickly. (I took the time a few years ago to go through my notes, winnow them, and organize them using the system Michael Hyatt describes in this post from a couple of years ago.) I’ve found the software so powerful that, for a number of years, I’ve …

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Does Your Teaching Encourage Epistemological Pluralism?

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I’m one of those women. The ones who studied science and gave up on ever being a member of that community. I studied computer science as an undergraduate, and even though I did well in my courses (I graduated with highest honors), I never felt that I was a “computer scientist” in the way that came naturally to many of my male colleagues. I have quite a few female friends who came out of this experience unharmed and went on to do PhDs in computer science. Not I. I shifted to education, found my …

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(Student) Blogging and the Fact of Other People

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[This is a guest post by Rebecca J. Hogue (@rjhogue), a multi-affiliated (aka adjunct/contingent) online lecturer (University of Massachusetts-Boston, Brock University) and avid blogger. She teaches Digital Citizenship and Instructional Design online. In addition, she works as a consultant helping to develop and produce self-published eBooks. Her research and innovation interests are in the areas of online collaboration, social media, and ePatient blogging.--JBJ]

With the push away from the LMS…

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Estimating Student Workload for Your Courses

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As the start of the fall term approaches, many ProfHacker readers are designing or revising course syllabi. Among the challenging decisions that instructors face in creating syllabi is the question of how much reading, writing, and other work to assign each week.

The federal definition of course credit hours assumes a minimum of “two hours of out-of-class student work per week for a semester hour.” According to this metric, a student should assume at least six hours of out-of-class work per wee…

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Use a Blogging Client as a Backup Method

As you may have read, author Dennis Cooper recently had his blog deleted from Google’s Blogspot platform without adequate explanation. My reaction to this story has been two-fold.

First, for anyone who has been writing online for any length of time, Cooper’s loss of several years’ worth of work is a sobering reminder that trusting your data to an online entity for safekeeping can lead to heartbreak. In situations like this, I would argue, Google needs to step up and provide not only a satisfyin…

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Project Arclight: a Digital Humanities Approach to Media Studies

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A new open-access book came across my social media feed a couple of months ago, The Arclight Guidebook to Media History and the Digital Humanities. The book itself is a great resource for those looking to get started with digital humanities approaches to doing media studies. What I didn’t realize was that the book is a part of a larger project, which has produced a cool tool, the Arclight app.

The app (and larger project) was developed as a collaboration between the University of Wisconsin-Madi…

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Getting Things Done with TaskPaper

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[This is a guest post by Nabeel Siddiqui, a doctoral candidate in American Studies at The College of William & Mary, where his research focuses on personal computers and the intersection of the public/private sphere. You can find him online here.--JBJ]

It’s safe to conclude the ProfHacker staff are fans of David Allen’s Getting Things Done. The book had a major influence on lifehacking , and a ton of software implements or uses its principles. Since starting graduate school, I have used Culture…