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Taking Notes on Primary Sources with Drupal

notebook page

As George noted in September, we’ve had a long-standing fascination with note-taking here at ProfHacker. (Heck, back before ProfHacker was a thing, I’d had a popular note-taking assignment, called Wikified Class Notes.) We’ve had posts on note-taking with AppleScript, paraphrasing as note-taking, note-taking in Zotero, note-taking with iOS, note-taking on a Nook Color … there’ve been a lot of posts about note-taking.

And with good reason! The ability to take good notes is an essential skill for…

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Why have multiple email applications on your phone?

Email applications installed on an iPhoneGiven that it was barely two weeks ago that I recommended decluttering one’s gadgets, it might seem odd for me to keep multiple email applications on my phone, but I do.

There’s a reason for that. In an effort to maintain some semblance of work-life balance, I’ve turned off all email notifications on my phone (even icon badges — I don’t want my email checking me), and I make it a point not to check work email after early evening.

Reading email from family and friends, however, doesn’t feel lik…

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Weekend Reading: Weathering the Storm of Progress

Knocked over traffic cone

I guess there’s not going to be any settling down, is there? Here, as is often the case, are some interesting articles to kick off your weekend:

  • Looks like Audrey Watters gave a barn-burner at the University of Richmond this week, on “Ed-Tech in a Time of Trump”: “A Time of Trump” could be “A Time of Neoliberalism” or “A Time of Libertarianism” or “A Time of Algorithmic Discrimination” or “A Time of Economic Precarity.” All of this is – from President Trump to the so-called “new economy” – h…
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Making Time for Deep Work

cat on desk

As Jason noted a year ago in his review of Cal Newport’s book Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World, Newport’s central claim will seem familiar to many academic readers: deep work — extended concentration on challenging problems — is both extremely valuable and difficult to commit to. If you’re used to jockeying among multiple browser tabs and responding to notifications all the time, your brain will crave that extra stimulus when you try to settle down to work more deeply….

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ACI Blog Index: Charging Money for Information About Free Content?

A book opened to its indexLast week, Jeff McClurken posted a query to Facebook: “Why does ACI get to charge people for access to my freely available blog posts?” That post led to a lengthy conversation about ACI’s Scholarly Blog Index. (Readers can view the full conversation, which also included Lee Skallerup Bessette, Sheila Brennan, and Michelle Moravec, here.)

I checked the site out, and discovered some of my own work there, too. I also tried doing a password reset, and, like Michelle Moravec, discovered I already had…

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New Pedagogical Resource – Prompt

A pile of journal articles

I’m always looking for pedagogical resources, as w
ell as publishing/scholarship opportunities for faculty (and myself) to publish in, and there is a new open-access journal, Prompt. It is, as stated in the editors’ introduction,

a multidisciplinary journal focused specifically on collegiate writing assignments. This journal highlights the pedagogical process of crafting writing assignments and offers contextualized reflections on teaching writing in varied disciplines.

The first issue features…

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Salam for Helplessness

Palm tree during Cairo sunset

“Are you coming to the US this summer?” people have been asking for months.

“If they let me in, inshallah,” I have been responding. Long before this week happened.

I know. You’re a good person. You care. You’re feeling enraged. And helpless. The rage may rise and fall, but the helplessness is a constant struggle. I know that feeling. Not every person can march and strike and stand in solidarity and advocate day in and day out. So here are some ways to get through this by focusing on what you ca…

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Archiving Information in a Digital Age

The Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” is an essential resource for anyone who wants to find information that used to be available online but that has disappeared or to find how a particular webpage has changed over time, perhaps because information was deleted or added. (The Wayback Machine is also quite useful for many other reasons.)

Recently, a number of easy-to-use tools have appeared that make it easier to find information in the Internet Archive or to save current information into the …

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Productivity-Talk Here at the End of All Things

panic button
People always say that one of the great things about academe is its familiar rhythm–the academic calendar, which has its moments of stress, can also be weirdly comforting. It’s also makes it sensible for blogging–it’s easy to know when it’s recommendation season, or when people are likely to be grading, or when a note about starting the semester by committing to self-care might be helpful.

And then sometimes there are weeks like this last one.

Today I wanted to link to two posts that have hel…

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Decluttering your gadgets

A neat, tidy deskIt’s still early in the year, which is often a good time to start fresh by doing some decluttering — and not just of our homes and workspaces. What about the gadgets we use daily: our computers, tablets, and phones?

I was reminded that this is a good practice late last month, when I read Anthony Karcz’s “Ring in the New Year With a Decluttered iPhone.” Though he focuses specifically on the iPhone, he makes a key point that applies to other phones as well — and to computers and tablets:

Old apps,…