by

Backup for Back to School

lock box

Cloud-based backup provider Crashplan (which we mentioned in Do You Have a Backup Plan? announced in August that it would no longer offer subscriptions designed for home or personal use. Current users’ plans would continue to run for a little over a year, until October 2018 when the Home version of their product would be shuttered completely. (Crashplan will continue to offer their Small Business package.)

Although this news is understandably frustrating to current Crashplan users, there are a …

by

Open Faculty Patchbook

5278639741_93be02c20c_b

I really love how new forms of open-access publishing online is inspiring faculty to create new forms of publications for pedagogy scholarship. Just because I happen to know a lot of people (including Maha) doesn’t negate the fact that I love the Open Faculty Patchbook: A Community Quilt of Pedagogy.

From the description:

Fleming College faculty and our peers around the world are building a community patchwork of ‘chapters’ into a quasi-textbook about pedagogy for teaching & learning in colleg…

by

Like Privacy? Try Brave

The swing of a soccer player

Serendipitous discovery is not just for apocryphally wandering through library stacks–sometimes you can stumble across a cool tool, as well. Friday offered just such an occasion: I was working through Moacier P. de Sá Pereira’s The Javascripting English Major (recommended in Weekend Reading), and in the first chapter I discovered a new-to-me-web browser: Brave.

Brave is a recent-ish browser (1.0 release last year), developed by a team led by Brendan Eich (who invented JavaScript) and Brian Bond…

by

From the Archives: Starting a New Semester

seminar table

Whether you’ve already been in the classroom for a week or two, or will be heading back in September, the ProfHacker archives are full of helpful tips to start the new semester off right. Here I mention several of our back to school roundup posts, highlighting just a few of the many links each contains.

The posts linked in From the Archives: Creating Syllabi (2014) focus on the basics of syllabus creation, including technology policies, accessibility, syllabus design, and our ever-popular 11 Fa…

by

Weekend Reading: Let’s Just Hold It Together Please

chain and a rope tied together

I hope everyone has a safe weekend, and one that’s as relaxing or rewarding as possible. Let’s get right to the links:

by

More-Inclusive Meetings

jj-jordan-252857

We’ve written a lot here at ProfHacker about making meetings and conferences better. Recently, I came across this list from University of Michigan Department of Human Resources, 10 Tips for Inclusive Meetings. The list is great for both meetings and conferences, and includes issues of accessibility and inclusion.

While it lists ensuring inclusive bathrooms, as well as requesting special accessibility needs well in advance in multiple formats, it doesn’t mention anything about preferred pronou…

by

What First Years Might Not Know & What To Do About It

College Hall sign

[This is a guest post (actually, a collated series of tweets, by Anne Trubek. Trubek is Director of Belt Publishing and author of The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting--and, to her points below, a former associate professor at Oberlin College.]

Teaching first-years today? Here are some things my son, starting college today, was never taught:

  1. How to address professors–Dr., Mr, Mrs., Miss, Ms., first name. Don’t get huffy if your students don’t know either. Teach them.
  2. How to ‘read’…
by

Participating in the Digital Polarization Initiative is now ‘Ridiculously Easy’

When I was at the Domains 2017 conference earlier this summer, Jon Udell issued a challenge – what are you doing to help the fight again digital polarization, “fake news,” and general media illiteracy? He has been working hard with Mike Caulfield on the Digital Polarization Initiative (which I’ve already written about), and they’ve come up with a new way to make it easier for teachers to incorporate the project into their classes.

(By the way, my part is using the platforms that I have access t…

by

The Dark Truth of Email Tips

The poet who couldn't write poetry

Once again, xkcd has gotten pretty directly at the truth of those of us with email struggles:


Merlin Mann has always suggested that people focused on the wrong parts of his somewhere-between-legendary-and-notorious “Inbox Zero” talk–that it was always about the psychology of email triage as much as tips and tricks for getting through email faster.

Photo probably “The Poet Who Couldn’t Write Poetry” (“Image from page 173 of ‘St. Nicholas’ (1873)”) by Flickr user Internet Archive Book Images /

by

On Writing: Anne Lamott

laptop and notebook

One of the things that most frequently causes writers to feel stuck or frustrated is trying to write and edit at the same time. These are two very different cognitive activities, and examining your last three sentences for flaws is a sure way to block the creative impulse that might lead to the next sentence.

The answer, of course, is to write what Anne Lamott calls “a shitty first draft” in Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life:

Very few writers really know what they are doing un…