Tag Archives: archives

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From the Archives: Closing Out the Fall Semester

sunset

Because of the ways academic calendars are constructed, the dates for the end of fall term classes, exam period, and final grade entry at different colleges can be spread out from late November to late January. Regardless of where you are in that sequence of events, this can be a hectic time of year, particularly if you have travel or holiday plans coming up. So here are a few tips from the ProfHacker archives to help you close out this semester or academic quarter. (You might also want to look…

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From the Archives: Preparing for the New Semester

classroom

It’s that time again . . .  here are some tips from the ProfHacker archives.

Designing/Revising Your Syllabi

If you’ve only got a few minutes, check out 11 Fast Syllabus Hacks for useful updates to your course documents.

Konrad’s Citing Syllabi suggests some best practices for citing the work of other instructors whose syllabi you’ve consulted and for ensuring your own syllabus can be shared and remixed if that’s your intent.

Jason’s Creative Approaches to the Syllabus provides links to a numbe…

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#TAGS: New Homepage for Twitter Archiving Google Sheet

Screen shot of "TAGS" home page.

Here at ProfHacker we’ve written quite a bit about Twitter over the years (as our archive of posts with the twitter tag reveals). One Twitter topic that we’ve addressed often is how best to maintain an archive of Tweets, whether your own or those associated with a particular hashtag. In two different posts, Mark introduced readers to what is, arguably, the best free solution for this: Martin Hawksey’s TAGS, “a free Google Sheet template which lets you setup and run automated collection of searc…

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From the Archives: On Grading (II)

A stack of papers

Grading student assignments is a significant feature of many academics’ workload, especially as the end of semester nears. In the years since our first round up post, From the Archives: On Grading we’ve written quite a few useful posts about grading philosopies, tools, and approaches:

Philosophies and Methods

In Cross-Disciplinary Grading Techniques, Heather wrote about adopting humanities methods for grading open-ended assignments to her physics courses.

Ryan writes about how he can Avoid ‘Gra…

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From the Archives: All About Games

Sorry board game

From playing games, to teaching with games, making your own games, and even gamifying your email — the ProfHacker archives have a lot to offer when thinking about games.

Games in the Classroom
Anastasia has written a very thorough series of posts on Games in the Classroom:

  1. Part 1 explains that games can help students through exploring content through new or multiple points of view, learning through making, and collaboration.

  2. Part 2 explains how and where to discover games that you might wan…

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From the Archives: Using Twitter

robinThe essential ProfHacker introduction to Twitter is Ryan’s appropriately titled post, How to Start Tweeting (and Why You Might Want To). He covers all the basics, including creating your profile, using lists, and following hashtags. But we’ve written quite a few other posts about this popular social media platform:

Making the Most of Twitter

Erin’s primer on Choosing #Hashtags explains how to make the most of this feature of Twitter.

I wrote about Using Twitter Lists to streamline your reading e…

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Why Not Spare a Little Bandwidth for the Archive Team?

Do you remember Seti@home? It was the first really widely loved example of a crowdsourced distributed computing project. You install a cool looking screensaver and in the background your computer crunches data on behalf of the noble cause of finding aliens in space. There are now many projects which take advantage of large networks of home computers to carry out tasks. The use of distributed computing for the “mining” in the virtual currency Bitcoin is another recent example from the news.

The …

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Digital Workflows for the Archives

 [This is a guest post by Dan Royles, a lecturer at the University of Angers in western France, where he teaches American Studies and English as a foreign language. You can find him online at danroyles.com, or follow him on Twitter at @danroyles.--@JBJ]

For those scholars whose methods take them to the archive, research can be as intimidating as it is exciting. Tracking down the sources you need is one thing, but what do you do when you’re actually faced with boxes full of yellowing documents? Lo…

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From the Archives: Academic Conferences

name badgesConferences are an important part of many people’s academic careers: they provide the opportunity to present your research to specialists in your field; to talk with friends and colleagues at other institutions; and to learn about new publications, methods, and current research. They can also cause anxiety or disappointment (especially those conferences that include job interviews). But being prepared for your next conference, whether it’s your first or your fiftieth, with some tips from the Pro…

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From the Archives: Start Your Semester Off Right

classroom

Beginning-of-semester and end-of-semester posts are something of a ProfHacker tradition, as well as the setting of resolutions for the new season. (See, for instance, last year’s From the Archives: New Semester, New Year and 2010′s Preparing for the First Week of Classes.) A few gems worth highlighting from some of these posts include:

In New Year’s Resolutions: Learning from Mistakes Edition, Amy reminds us of two key points about using a calendar to your best advantage:

  • Look at it every morn…