Tag Archives: collaboration


Virtual Techniques for Co-writing

Over the past year, I’ve found myself involved in more collaborative writing projects. This isn’t really something that came up in my discipline in grad school, where everything I worked on was written alone. These projects are much harder to organize than my solo work: often, they span several platforms, multiple email threads, chats, and files.

I’ve noticed that everyone I work with has a different preference for technologies and strategies. Here are a few I’ve been using, and their advantage…


Considerate Collaboration: Google Docs

Bee about to land on flower

A large portion of the work I do exists on Google Docs – whether working on internal documents within my department, for committees, within my classes, or collaborating online to co-author articles, organize events, or provide feedback to other writers. Over time, I realized that just because many people can use Google Docs does not mean they are always considerate in the ways they collaborate on Google Docs. Here are some tips on some areas I feel collaborators (whether peers, or teacher/stude…


Managing Slack

Photo of a street sign: "Slack End"

Over the past couple of years, the on-trend communication tool among technology types has, no doubt, been Slack. Lee wrote an introductory post about it in August, and Maha followed up a couple of weeks later with some thoughts about when to use it.

The past week saw two interesting posts that look at Slack from very different “management” angles:


Tweeting with Collaborators: Group Tweet vs TweetDeck Teams


Have you ever worked with a team of different people, all of you needing access to the same Twitter account (representing an organization or project you all work on) at different times? Of course, the intuitive thing to do is to share the password to the account, and to all be logged on to it. However, this is not optimal for several reasons:

  1. If you are like me in a different country from your collaborators (most of mine are in North America), Twitter gets suspicious and will put you through …


6 Steps to Expanding a Successful Online Initiative – Virtually Connecting

Photo of vconnecting

Photo by Ashley G. Shaw at #altc conference during @vconnecting session
L to R: Martin Hawksey, Martin Weller, Rebecca J. Hogue, Maha Bali

This post is co-authored with Rebecca J. Hogue (@rjhogue), an itinerant scholar and prolific blogger. She is co-founder of Virtually Connecting, and Associate Lecturer at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. Professionally, she produces self-published eBooks, and teaches Emerging Technologies and Instructional Design online. Her research and innovation inte…


Dropbox’s File Request Eases Receiving Files and Assignments


At a conservative estimate, ProfHacker writers have posted eleventy-billion times about Dropbox, the popular near-ubiquitous service for saving, syncing, and sharing files. And with good reason! It’s a great service, fast, and convenient–especially for people who use several different computers and devices over the course of a day, it’s frequently the glue that makes that work cohere.

This summer, Dropbox released two new features–one of which might be particularly appealing to academics: file …


Playing Cards in the Classroom for Student Collaboration

In my courses, I often put students into small, temporary groups for collaborative work that takes place in class or over the course of a few days. This work ranges from analysis of an assigned reading to researching a local issue to creating a digital resource to conducting an interview with a faculty or community member. We cover how to ensure effective collaboration and communication in small groups, including assigning and managing tasks (something for which an online tool like Basecamp can…


Team Productivity Through Slack

When I started my undergrad, it was the first year that our university gave out an email address to everyone; previously, it was only by request. Our residence halls had also just been updated with what then was considered “high speed” internet (which I think was fiber optic?) instead of dial-up. I was WIRED in 1996, and I used email and the messaging service ICQ obsessively to stay in touch with my friends and family. My friends thought it was so cool that my mom emailed me (because she ac…


A Bill of Rights for Student Collaborators


One exciting aspect of digital humanities work is its openness to collaboration, including collaboration with students. As someone who used to coordinate an undergraduate research program, I’ve always been particularly excited about opportunities to involve students in meaningful research–and participating actively in an ongoing research project certainly counts!

But undergraduate participation in research also raises a whole host of thorny questions–around compensation, around acknowledgment, …


Saying Goodbye to EMiC


I got an email recently asking me for my final report to wrap up the Editing Modernism in Canada (EMiC) project, which ended April 1. For the past seven years, money from the Federal Government in Canada helped build both a physical infrastructure (Modernist Commons) and capacity (through training opportunities) in order to build a critical community online around Canadian Modernism and beyond. The moto for the project was: “Collaborate. Edit. Learn.”

I have been known to being prone to hyperbo…