Tag Archives: digital humanities


Project Arclight: a Digital Humanities Approach to Media Studies


A new open-access book came across my social media feed a couple of months ago, The Arclight Guidebook to Media History and the Digital Humanities. The book itself is a great resource for those looking to get started with digital humanities approaches to doing media studies. What I didn’t realize was that the book is a part of a larger project, which has produced a cool tool, the Arclight app.

The app (and larger project) was developed as a collaboration between the University of Wisconsin-Madi…


Text Analysis With Voyant 2.0

Voyant Logo

A few weeks ago, coincidentally during Day of DH 2016, it was brought to my attention that Voyant, a web-based text analysis tool, had upgraded to Version 2.0.

Voyant 2.0

This has been a popular tool with ProfHackers (I’ve written about using it as has Brian), and the new version is a great improvement. The list of changes includes:

  • a cleaner, crisper appearance

  • better cross-platform and mobile device support (all tools in HTML5, no Flash or Java Applets)

  • advanced search capabilities, including wil…


2016 Digital Humanities Training Opportunities

Last year, I wrote a post rounding up the DH training opportunities as I knew them for the summer of 2015 (and beyond). The 2016 list is quite similar. It includes, as a part of the DH Training Network:



A Bill of Rights for Student Collaborators


One exciting aspect of digital humanities work is its openness to collaboration, including collaboration with students. As someone who used to coordinate an undergraduate research program, I’ve always been particularly excited about opportunities to involve students in meaningful research–and participating actively in an ongoing research project certainly counts!

But undergraduate participation in research also raises a whole host of thorny questions–around compensation, around acknowledgment, …


Saying Goodbye to EMiC


I got an email recently asking me for my final report to wrap up the Editing Modernism in Canada (EMiC) project, which ended April 1. For the past seven years, money from the Federal Government in Canada helped build both a physical infrastructure (Modernist Commons) and capacity (through training opportunities) in order to build a critical community online around Canadian Modernism and beyond. The moto for the project was: “Collaborate. Edit. Learn.”

I have been known to being prone to hyperbo…


New Features on the DiRT Directory


DiRT (formerly known as Bamboo DiRT) is a repository of digital tools, organized, and curated by users. The idea behind its creation — as explained in this 2013 post by Seth Denbo — was to try and eliminate the re-creation of digital teaching and research tools that already existed. It has always been my go-to resource for finding tools, as well as sending students and faculty there so they can begin to explore and imagine ways that they might integrate digital assignments into their classrooms…


The Latest from Digital Humanities Questions and Answers


Launched in September of 2010, Digital Humanities Questions & Answers is a joint venture of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and ProfHacker. (See Julie Meloni’s launch announcement.)

Digital Humanities Questions and Answers (@DHAnswers on Twitter) is designed to be a free resource where anyone with an interest in the digital humanities can pose a question to the community of folks working in the field.

Since we last checked in with the site, many interesting threads have b…


Digital Humanities Training Opportunities

[Lee Skallerup Bessette is a Faculty Instructional Consultant at the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CELT) at the University of Kentucky. She primarily works with faculty on digital pedagogy and digital humanities. She blogs at College Ready Writing and you can find her tweeting prolifically at @readywriting.--@JBJ]

It’s getting to be (or, really, probably past, but let’s face it, we all procrastinate) that time where we plan for what we will be doing with our summers. And,…


Weekend Reading: Umbrellas in Portugal Edition


Happy Weekend, ProfHacker friends!

The title and image for today’s Weekend Reading comes from the Ágitagueda art festival, an annual tradition in Portugal this month that was recently featured in Bored Panda.

If you have even a fleeting interest in the digital humanities, it is well-worth your while to check out Bethany Nowviskie’s keynote address, “Digital Humanities in the Anthropocene,” from the 2014 DH Conference which just wrapped up in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Lots going on this weekend: pe…


DHSI 2014: On Building


I was one of some 600 people who gathered at the University of Victoria last week to participate in this year’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). A couple years ago, Natalie wrote a great post about DHSI that is still timely. I won’t repeat what she’s said. Rather, I want to reflect on the many ways that the Digital Humanities is all about building. I’m not interested in making an argument that Stephen Ramsey himself has backed away from since he made his controversial and provocative…