Tag Archives: Digital Literacy

by

New Teaching Resource for Digital Literacy

Lego Yetis in Confederate Uniforms

I’ve already shared the work Mike Caulfield is doing with the Digital Polarization Initiative, as well as the analysis he has done (and continues to do) on his blog. Now Mike has published an OER textbook, Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers. It can be used alongside the Digital Polarization Initiative work (which I am going to be doing in a few weeks) or as a stand-alone textbook or resource. You can find the book in different formats linked on his blog.

Much of what is in the textbook is b…

by

Playing at Computational Thinking with The Tessera

Earlier this month, a team of researchers from Brigham Young University and University of Maryland, led by Derek Hansen and Kari Kraus, launched a new free educational game The Tessera: Ghostly Tracks. Funded in part by the NSF, the game is a beautiful way to explore principles of computational thinking in a multiplayer, narrative-driven setting while unraveling a ghost story.

The web-based game works well on any fairly up-to-date browser, and doesn’t require any downloads. To play, just make a

by

Combatting Digital Polarization

Cross Polarization

I’ve already written about the spread of fake news and how to work to stop it. And given what happened this weekend is D.C. and that most people who see fake news believe it, it is imperative that we work to improve the way we read and consume media and “news.”

Mike Caulfield, whose research and efforts I mentioned in my last post, has just launched a new tool and resource for educators and students: The Digital Polarization Initiative. The initiative is supported by the AASCU’s American Demo…

by

On Digital Literacies

This post is co-authored with fellow Prof Hacker Lee Skallerup Bessette and Autumm Caines, Associate Director of Academic Technology in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Capital University in Columbus Ohio, and co-director of Virtually Connecting. Caines blogs at autumm.edtech.fm and DigCiz.org.

 “Buying into a system doesn’t automagically make you, or a University, digitally literate or creative” — Sheila MacNeill

The New Media Consortium recently released a Strategic Bri…

by

Advice for Content-Independent Teaching

glass house

I’m going to share here my personal view of what makes it possible to teach a course in a content-independent manner. These may not be the same as what and why other people do it, but it’s why and how I do it.

What Do I Mean by Content-Independent?

My students read for my course. So it’s not that there is zero content. But I mean that my courses (and also sometimes workshops) are not organized around a canonical body of content. I’m not just saying no textbook. I’m saying no assigned readings. …

by

When the Technology Changes on You

4356825976_7f5641272d_b
When we use technology extensively in our teaching (or work in general, really), how do we handle unexpected changes to that technology? Here are some thoughts and workarounds. (note: this was inspired by the recent change on Twitter from stars to hearts)

A Website Disappears

Someone recently tweeted about how a website suddenly disappeared a few hours before she was planning to use it in her class. I pointed her to the Wayback Machine (if you haven’t heard of this, it’s an internet archive – y…

by

“Program or Be Programmed”?

hello, worldAs the job market is getting even less welcoming, and digital skills are at the forefront of national discourse, digital literacy objectives are being integrated into student learning goals across disciplines. But there are still a lot of questions to answer: what skills are essential? Do students in all majors benefit from learning to program?

Stephen Ramsay started a debate when he argued that to be part of the digital humanities, at least in his program, you had to learn code. At ProfHacker, …