Tag Archives: digital pedagogy

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New Keywords on Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

Manifesto for Teaching Online

I’ve made note before (in December 2015 and last June) about the open review process for the Modern Language Association’s project, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, “a curated collection of reusable and remixable pedagogical artifacts for humanities scholars.”

There’s a new batch of keywords open for review, and they’re pretty great:

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New Keywords on Digital Pedagogy

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In December, I posted about the MLA’s open review process for a new collection, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments.

To kick off the summer, the editors–Katherine Harris, Rebecca Frost Davis, Jentery Sayers, and Matt Gold–have released a fresh batch of keywords, open for review until July 1. They include: George Williams on “Access”; Diane K. Jakacki on “Blogging”; Joyce R. Walker on “Classr…

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2016 Digital Humanities Training Opportunities

Last year, I wrote a post rounding up the DH training opportunities as I knew them for the summer of 2015 (and beyond). The 2016 list is quite similar. It includes, as a part of the DH Training Network:

Appl…

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Crowdsourcing Curating Networks: It Has to Be Meta

(This post is co-authored with Mia Zamora, School of English Studies, Kean University).

Last week on ProfHacker, Jason Jones invited readers to participate in the open/published peer review process of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, published by MLA as a collection of keywords curated by different authors. Have you had a chance to take a look and comment?

In a future phase of keywords for this book, we (Maha and Mia) will be curating the keyword Networks. …

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Open Review for Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities

screenshot of MLA website

The MLA is publishing a collection of keywords on Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, which features curated sections on a variety of topics related to digital teaching methods. (I am on the advisory board for this collection.)

One of the interesting aspects of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities is that the keywords are available for open peer review and public comment. This is being staged in batches, both as a sanity-preserving mechanism and to make sure eac…

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New Online Courses in Digital Pedagogy

Digital Pedagogy Lab screenshot

There is a ton of free material on learning how to teach with new digital tools online. That’s one of the best things that ProfHacker writers have been dispensing since its inception. We’ve written about teaching with Twitter, with Wikipedia, creating interactive texts with Twine, even the Creepy Treehouse problem of friending your students on social media. One of the things we haven’t done, though, is offer online courses on digital pedagogy–a new venture the journal Hybrid Pedagogy has taken …

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Introducing the Digital Pedagogy Lab

Digital Pedagogy Lab

If you’re itching to brush up your digital teaching chops over the summer, the journal Hybrid Pedagogy is offering a Digital Pedagogy Lab this summer. Slated to take place at the University of Wisconsin, Madison from August 10-14, 2015, the lab is a five-day practical institute that will combine discussions of digital pedagogy theory with hands-on practice.

Digital Pedagogy Lab will offer three tracks, each capped at 25 students:

  1. Praxis, by Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris, is an examina…

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40 Android Apps for Teaching and Learning

A few weeks ago I invited readers to share their favorite iPad apps for the classroom, and the comments section features several good suggestions. Last week I asked readers to share their favorite Android apps for the classroom, and… well… we didn’t end up with nearly as many suggestions.

I do not own an Android device, but I spent some time searching for apps that might prove useful for pedagogical purposes, and the list below is the result.

(I’ve also made this information available as a spr…

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Adventures in Synchronous Online Teaching

A few weeks ago I discussed some of the questions on my mind as I prepared to teach my first online class. I’m now a few weeks into teaching my online-only graduate seminar, and I’m getting used to the quirks that go with eliminating the classroom.

Technology-wise, I’m relying on the university’s hosted Sakai. Our version suffers from lots of problems, including an over-complicated organization system that’s better suited to asynchronous courses than my synchronous model and a tendency to break…

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eNotations: Produce Your Own Critical Edition In Class

Can students produce their own learning content? Cathy Davidson (@cathyndavidson) thinks so, and has been challenging educators to make this happen. Last semester I modestly attempted answer her call by asking my students to create their own annotated critical edition of a literary text. This assignment was part of a “Literary Research” seminar, a gateway course that introduces students to research methodologies for the literature major. One of its pedagogical goals is to train students to …