Tag Archives: GitHub

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How to Store Your Twitter Archive on Github Pages

It’s no secret that here at ProfHacker we’re interested in the ways Twitter can be used in higher education, and one of our favorite tools for working with Twitter is Martin Hawksey’s TAGS, “a free Google Sheet template which lets you setup and run automated collection of search results from Twitter.”

As Mark has written, Something cool you can do with Hawksey’s TAGS is create an automatically updated, publicly viewable archive of all of your Tweets. Mark keeps his archive on GoogleDrive, which…

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Citing Syllabi

5167905071_e42568a44f_zMy first experience in the syllabi bakery was years ago while doing some tech support for a certain well-known scholar. She was staring at the beginnings of a reading list on her office computer while I tried to restore a dead laptop. Suddenly, she jumped to her feet and began to browse through her impressive collection of books, ‘Agency,’ she mumbled, ‘I need to assign something on agency.’ The professor was still on a search for agency when I left.

Wow, that looks hard, I thought. Having read …

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Making History Accessible: SlaveryStories.org

SlaveryStories_screenshot

Sometimes, an interesting project gets started unexpectedly. That’s what happened with SlaveryStories.org, a new, collaborative digital project that launched February 3, just as Black History Month began.

So what is SlaveryStories.org? It’s an online home for stories about slavery, told from the perspective of the slaves themselves.

The project got its start shortly after Rob Walsh, one of Scholastica’s* founders, went to see Twelve Years a Slave. He decided to read Solomon Northup’s memoir, …

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Fork the Academy

I recently wrapped up a series on GitHub. Throughout the series I highlighted what I thought were some of the most powerful innovations that software developers and writers can take advantage of in GitHub. In particular I looked at two of its collaborative features, the ability to "fork" repositories of text that retain a connection to the original and the issuing of "pull requests" as a way to enable outside contributions in an decentralized environment which leaves everyone with full control o…

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The Limitations of GitHub for Writers

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This posting is the last in a series introducing the text hosting and version control service GitHub (See parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and “>5). Up until this posting I have talked about some of the great features of working with repositories of text in GitHub and the ways in which it facilitates collaboration even without direct collaboration. It is, in its own motto, a "social coding" environment that allows anyone to "fork" code, issue "pull requests" to propose improvements on someone else’s work, as …

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Resources for Learning Git and GitHub

Professortocat_v2Over the past few weeks I have been taking a closer look at how to use the text hosting and version control service at GitHub: part 1, part 2, part 3, and part 4. I have suggested that, in addition to being the most important hub of open source and free software on the net, its innovations also have powerful applications for any kind of collaborative authorship thanks to its distributed version control features, the process of "forking" repositories, and the social power of issuing "pull request…

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File and Repository History in GitHub

inspectocatThis post continues a series here at ProfHacker on GitHub. The series began with the suggestion that this service, primarily used to host code repositories and facilitate collaboration between programmers, is also home to many innovations that offer powerful ways forward across the realm of academic scholarship.

As we saw in the last post, and several earlier posts by fellow ProfHackers, GitHub has a “social” element that ties a community of shared and replicated groups of text together through …

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Forks and Pull Requests in GitHub

Today we’ll continue our series of postings on GitHub. In the first posting I introduced GitHub, pointed to some of the previous postings here at ProfHacker that have talked about it, and went through the steps of setting up a basic repository. Last week, we looked at the most common workflow for working with GitHub as a version control platform for text, and showed how you could directly edit text files through the GitHub website, instead of in your offline copy of a repository.

From what we ha…

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Direct Editing and Zen Mode in GitHub

Calligraphy by Vaya B

In my last posting I went through the simple steps of starting a brand new repository on GitHub, the leading online service for hosting code and text based projects backed with the version control system git. At the end of the last posting our new repository had only a single file saved in the repository’s folder. Using the GitHub client software, we published the repository to our free online GitHub account. In this posting I’ll describe the most basic workflow of modifying or adding files in …

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Getting Started With a GitHub Repository

skitchtocat

If we look across the landscape of collaborative writing on the web, there are a few clearly discernible hubs of activity. Wikipedia and Google Docs might be identified as two of them, but one the most remarkable and unique is GitHub. This is the first of a new series of postings on GitHub, its limits, and some emerging alternatives for scholarship. GitHub is the leading hosting service for code that runs the powerful distributed version control software git (see Julie’s introduction for more o…