Tag Archives: privacy

by

Firefox Focus Browser Provides Privacy and Content Blocking

For a few months now I’ve been intermittently using Firefox Focus to browse the web on my iPhone. It’s a free web browser for iOS, created by the Mozilla Foundation, the same folks behind the Firefox browser. What makes Firefox Focus different, however, is the fact that it’s designed to be “a dedicated privacy browser with tracking protection and content blocking.

In other words, if you don’t want your Amazon shopping history (to cite one potential scenario) being communicated to the other webs…

by

Resisting Surveillance

graffiti of a surveillance camera

There are many reasons to start paying increased attention to security and privacy, especially in light of the election. Heck, just today Russian hackers launched a phishing attack at NGOs and policy think tanks, using “purpose-built Gmail accounts and what may be a compromised e-mail account from Harvard University’s Faculty of Arts and Science.” In addition to NGOs and think tanks, “another wave of similar e-mails targeted universities” last month. So protecting yourself online is probably a …

by

What Does Facebook Think It Knows About You?

Facebook

Audrey Watters shared this link to a ProPublica Series, Machine Bias, with a post on understanding Facebook and all that they know about us. I was particularly interested in the Chrome plugin that lets you know what Facebook thinks you like. They are inviting people to share their experiences, as well, to try and better understand what Facebook thinks it knows about us, its (proverbial) users.

I was particularly interested in how I could integrate this reading and exercise into my Introduction …

by

Have Your Accounts Been Compromised?

LEGO minifigs
Having accounts spread hither and yon across the internet, and the ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ approach that’s too often taken toward security and privacy, there’s a pretty decent chance that at some point, a service you use will face a data breach.

Heck, it might have already happened, and you didn’t know about it, either because you were too busy to notice, or maybe you’d even forgotten you have an account on that service!

A quick and easy way to see if your accounts have been included in a data breach is to…

by

Content Blocking in iOS 9 with Adamant

One of the most popular, if controversial, features of iOS 9 is the built-in support for content blockers in Safari. On the one hand, I think most people are probably willing to pay for quality content; on the other hand, a lot of pretty awful stuff goes on in the world of online advertising, especially on mobile devices. Trying to access many mobile sites, especially mobile news sites, can result in massive amounts of data and battery use … just to get to the ads. It’s one thing to agree to wa…

by

Browse More Privately with the Privacy Badger

9476835808_aa61793e33_z

Do you like privacy online? Do you like adorable–if fierce–animals? Of course you do! So you will probably be interested in the fact that, earlier this month, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (previously) announced that Privacy Badger, their anti-tracking browser extension, has officially reached 1.0 status, and is now available in a stable release for Chrome and Firefox users.

Privacy Badger differs from adblockers in that it does not block ads as such; instead, it blocks a specific behavior…

by

What to Do in Case of a Data Breach?

The only good kind of breach.

[Lee Skallerup Bessette is a Faculty Instructional Consultant at the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CELT) at the University of Kentucky. She primarily works with faculty on digital pedagogy and digital humanities. She blogs at College Ready Writing and you can find her tweeting prolifically at @readywriting.–@JBJ]

You might be one of the 80 million people impacted by the cyber-security breach at health insurance provider Anthem yesterday; I am. [Me, too! – JBJ] While my me…

by

Weekend Reading: Hello October Edition

Happy Friday, ProfHackers!

The Atlantic confirms what many us have known for some time now: “Online Relationships Are Real.” Also from The Atlantic is an interesting look at they way NYU philosopher Helen Nissbaum is shaping national policy on privacy.

It’s football season, which means different things for different campuses: tailgates, crowds, difficulty parking, empty libraries (my personal favorite!), but this year it also means something very different: concussions. Last weekend, the Univers…

by

A Not-so-gentle Reminder about Security: Heartbleed

A couple of days before yesterday’s post was scheduled to run, we started hearing about the Heartbleed Bug.

This is a nasty one. It’s been out for quite a while, and it’s a flaw in a software library that’s used by a very high number of websites. Check the link above for the details of just how nasty the bug is.

What can readers do to protect their data?

An important part of the necessary response is beyond any individual user’s control. If a website was using the affected version of OpenSSL, i…

by

A Gentle Reminder about Security

Padlocks

[Editor's note: We will publish a follow-up post next week tomorrow about the Heartbleed Bug, which has been making headlines this week. You can read this follow-up post here.]

There are a lot of benefits to doing much of our work online. Collaboration with far-away colleagues is easy, we can have ready access to our work no matter what device we’re using, and having our work backed up in the cloud can be reassuring.

But there’s danger as well, unfortunately. In just the past two months, at lea…