Tag Archives: research

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Using Text Analysis to Discover Work in JSTOR

grounds in coffee

JSTOR have just announced the JSTOR Labs Text Analyzer, a clever tool–still in Beta–that will analyze any document you upload (or text that you copy and paste) and find suggested matches in the JSTOR archives. It’s an interesting proposition–if you click that link on a phone, you can even take a picture of text and the Analyzer will process that.

You can find out more about how it works at this link, but I thought it would be fun to run it through a paper I published a while back. The paper was…

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Researching While Administrating

a pile of binders

Although at ProfHacker we tend to write from the point of view of faculty members, it’s also the case that many folks will move into an administrative, or at least quasi-administrative, role for some period in their career. (I’ve seen departments where everyone takes a turn being chair, for example.)

It’s a mistake to think of a shift into administration as necessarily a death knell for one’s research, although obviously the pace or focus of that research might change. (This is a topic of spec…

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Archiving Information in a Digital Age

The Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine” is an essential resource for anyone who wants to find information that used to be available online but that has disappeared or to find how a particular webpage has changed over time, perhaps because information was deleted or added. (The Wayback Machine is also quite useful for many other reasons.)

Recently, a number of easy-to-use tools have appeared that make it easier to find information in the Internet Archive or to save current information into the …

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Fostering Permeability in Academia

stack of colorful...beanbags with smiley faces?

“Equality is not a credential. Equality is a task. It is what we have to do, because we are not there yet” - Sara Ahmed

“…universities often describe their missions by drawing on the languages of diversity as well as equality. But using the language does not translate into creating diverse or equal environments. This “not translation” is something we experience: it is a gap between a symbolic commitment and a lived reality.” – Sara Ahmed

I am currently reading a book entitled Presumed Incompete…

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LibGuides: Best Use Scenarios?

I’ve always been kind of ambivalent about LibGuides (and similar tools for helping people navigate topics in the library). If you’re not already familiar with LibGuides, here’s a quick definition courtesy of the Library Success wiki: “A LibGuide is a content management and publishing system created by SpringShare. Libraries may use LibGuides to create subject guides, course guides, information portals, or research help pages to name a few.” You can find many examples across a wide range of topi…

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Using Video and Audio to Share Our Scholarship

person listening to headphones

 

[This is a guest post by George Veletsianos, Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology and an associate professor at Royal Roads University, where he teaches in the MA in Learning and Technology program, and researches networked scholarship and digital learning. He blogs at http://www.veletsianos.com and you can follow him on Twitter @veletsianos.--@JBJ]

I use an eclectic assortment of learning resources in my courses. Books, peer-reviewed journal articles, op-eds, white pap…

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Smithsonian Learning Lab Allows for Interdisciplinary Research and Discovery

Learning Lab Logo Laptop Sticker

A few weeks ago — Oh look, it was a month ago! Where did June go? — I attended THATCamp NoVa CC (Northern Virginia Community College). THATCamps are always wonderful for learning about new resources. One of those resources is the newly created Smithsonian Learning Lab, a platform to access and curate the millions of resources across all of the 19 Smithsonian museums, nine research institutes, and the National Zoo.

Having gotten the chance to play with it while at THATCamp, I have to say that it…

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Research Day @AUC – do we need more such cross-disciplinary campus events?

On March 30th, the American University in Cairo held its first Research Day. The highlights included posters by graduate and undergraduate students (competing for prizes) and 2-minute research pitches by faculty (also competing for awards).

I was involved in multiple ways. I was presenting a couple of posters (faculty also were allowed to present posters but not compete for awards, and so very few ended up presenting posters), presenting a pitch on behalf of a team from my department, and I was…

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New Features on the DiRT Directory

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DiRT (formerly known as Bamboo DiRT) is a repository of digital tools, organized, and curated by users. The idea behind its creation — as explained in this 2013 post by Seth Denbo — was to try and eliminate the re-creation of digital teaching and research tools that already existed. It has always been my go-to resource for finding tools, as well as sending students and faculty there so they can begin to explore and imagine ways that they might integrate digital assignments into their classrooms…

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Basecamp Announces Free Accounts for Teachers

basecamp-schools
Back in 2011, Heather wrote a great post about using the project management web service Basecamp for organizing student research. In 2012, however, Basecamp eliminated the option to maintain a free account, and their least expensive expensive paid plan is $20. That’s a perfectly understandable decision, of course, but for the individual teacher, the change might inspire a move to one of their competitors with free account options, such as Trello.

Well, if you’ve been holding back from using Bas…