Tag Archives: rubrics

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Grading Differently

A staircase with blue books tumbling down it

The thing that I dislike most about teaching is grading. It’s not so much a problem of being sent to the salt mines (an expression that Natalie usefully interrogated a few years ago) or even the time that the task requires and which leads to the feeling of being locked in grading jail. In that post, Nels pointed out that we don’t like grading because we feel it is stressful but notes that the origins of that stress can come from very different directions. Perhaps these different stresses are th…

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Keeping Up With Online Assignments and Grading

Busy!One of the best parts of of being a union president is that you get invited to new faculty orientation and similar events every year, so you get to meet new colleagues from all over campus. This year, at lunch, the topic of discussion at my table eventually turned toward learning management systems vs. roll-your-own assignments. New part-time faculty often have the experience of having to juggle multiple LMS platforms–one for each campus or system–every semester, which isn’t fun or efficient.

I…

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Your Grading Process

Candles I still have all of the essays I have ever written as an undergraduate or graduate student, including all the ones I originally wrote on a typewriter.  One from my Shakespeare class still stands out to me for no reason other than there is a spot on page three where the page is wrinkled, and the professor wrote, “Sorry. Water.”  It was one of those moments like the one in Mean Girls, one of my favorite films of all time, when one of the high-school students says, “Oh, I love seeing teache…

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Cross-Disciplinary Grading Techniques

A picture of a young man writing on a transparent writing surface.In some academic fields, such as the humanities, open-ended questions in essay form are de rigueur for assessment purposes. In my specialty, part of the sciences, assessment tools are often designed to prompt the student for a single, final (and often numerical) answer. It’s usual for instructors to deduct a number of points here and there when students omit a negative sign or make an algebra misstep in the development of the solution. But as one of my colleagues put it the other day, this type …

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A Rubric for Evaluating Student Blogs

A wall calendar full of informationThe pedagogical value and the challenges of integrating student blogging into your teaching is a recurring topic on ProfHacker. Some of our earliest posts dealt with student blogging, and we have revisited the issue frequently. Most recently, Jeff and Julie wrote about that age-old question—How are you going to grade this?—when it comes to evaluating classroom blogs. Jeff and Julie offer a number of fantastic pointers, and they also refer to a blogging rubric that I use in my own teaching. I’ve …

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‘How are you going to grade this?’: Evaluating Classroom Blogs

blogging tips[Editor's Note: This post was written jointly by Jeff McClurken and Julie Meloni.]

Several of us at ProfHacker incorporate blogs into our pedagogy, and we have written on a range of course blog-related issues such as “Integrating, Evaluating, and Managing Blogging in the Classroom” (Julie) and “Tools for Managing Multiple Class Blogs” (Amy) among many others. In this post we (Jeff and Julie) will offer a few specific tips for evaluating course blogs and addressing the common question “how are yo…

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Update on Rubrick

This is a quick follow-up to last week’s post about Rübrick, the Firefox plug-in for assessing or grading online work that a few of us are developing for Mozilla’s Jetpack for Learning Design Challenge.

The Mozilla folks have picked a group of projects to help design and implement working prototypes over the next two months.  Rübrick is one, and some of the others look cool also:

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Is it too early to think about grading?

image by flickr user davidsilver / cc licensed

image by flickr user davidsilver / cc licensed

Especially if your semester hasn’t started yet, it probably seems a bit early to think about grading.  But spending a little time now setting up the broad parameters of your papers or projects can pay off dramatically during the semester, when you’re too busy and tired to think straight.

I like to use rubrics when grading.  A rubric is a checklist or a template that you can use to quickly indicate strengths and weaknesses of a paper.  Here’…