Tag Archives: social media


What Does Facebook Think It Knows About You?


Audrey Watters shared this link to a ProPublica Series, Machine Bias, with a post on understanding Facebook and all that they know about us. I was particularly interested in the Chrome plugin that lets you know what Facebook thinks you like. They are inviting people to share their experiences, as well, to try and better understand what Facebook thinks it knows about us, its (proverbial) users.

I was particularly interested in how I could integrate this reading and exercise into my Introduction …


How Twitter Changed My Life

One evening last week, while watching hockey (HOCKEY IS BACK) and scrolling though twitter, I noticed a hashtag that had started to trend: #HowTwitterHasChangedMyLife. Of course, the hashtag was filled with funny and nonsensical, and more than a little sarcastic, tweets, but if it’s crossing my field of vision, it means those associated with higher education have discovered it.

Going through the hashtag, it’s amazing to see how many friendships and relationships have been formed over the social …


How to Store Your Twitter Archive on Github Pages

It’s no secret that here at ProfHacker we’re interested in the ways Twitter can be used in higher education, and one of our favorite tools for working with Twitter is Martin Hawksey’s TAGS, “a free Google Sheet template which lets you setup and run automated collection of search results from Twitter.”

As Mark has written, Something cool you can do with Hawksey’s TAGS is create an automatically updated, publicly viewable archive of all of your Tweets. Mark keeps his archive on GoogleDrive, which…


Free Course: Social Media Analytics


Because I’m a nerd, one of the fun things I like doing over the summer is to learn something new. While we can’t all afford to go to a fancy summer institute (although, they are a ton of fun), there are lots of free options both online and through books at your library. One course that I’m interested in is Social Media Analytics from Future Learn.

What differentiated this particular course, for me, is that is was short (only three weeks) and not particularly time intensive (three hours a week)….


Why You Just Lost 20 Minutes to the Internet

red clock

When was the last time you checked email, Facebook, or Twitter? (Are you checking those feeds right now, while you’ve got a tab open for this blog post?)

Does your time on the internet distract you from your priority projects and tasks? If so, you’re not alone.  Almost everyone I talk to about productivity complains about losing time online because it’s so easy to find yourself following a trail of links you didn’t deliberately set out to read.

In fact, most apps and online sites are intentiona…


Context Matters in Social Media

I’ve been thinking for a while that the real barrier to entry on Twitter is the layers of context you need to have in order to be able to navigate it well. I believe the reason you can have deep conversations in 140 characters aren’t because it’s easy to make deep and meaningful statements in 140 characters (though some people are masters at this), but rather because there are layers of contexts behind each 140 character statement, such that someone who is aware of the context gets so much more…


Tweeting with Collaborators: Group Tweet vs TweetDeck Teams


Have you ever worked with a team of different people, all of you needing access to the same Twitter account (representing an organization or project you all work on) at different times? Of course, the intuitive thing to do is to share the password to the account, and to all be logged on to it. However, this is not optimal for several reasons:

  1. If you are like me in a different country from your collaborators (most of mine are in North America), Twitter gets suspicious and will put you through …


Serendipitous Learning on Twitter


[Maha Bali is Associate Professor of Practice at the Center for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo, Egypt. Her primary role is a faculty developer but she also teaches educational game design to undergrads and ed tech to in-service teachers. She is a co-facilitator of edcontexts.org and columnist at Hybrid Pedagogy. She blogs at http://blog.mahabali.me and tweets @bali_maha.–@JBJ

I really appreciated this recent Chronicle Conversation post by Thomas Fisher in which he rec…


From the Archives: At the End of the Academic Year, Looking Back and Looking Forward

A desk with papers and a laptop computerIt’s graduation season; most colleges and universities have finished for the year, or will in just a few more weeks. That provides an opportunity to take stock of the year just completed, and look to the year ahead. It’s also a good opportunity to get caught up on some of the organizing tasks that often go undone in the last frantic weeks of the academic year.

Over the years, writers here at ProfHacker have provided a number of posts about things to do at this time of year:


“Know Thy Selfie”: A Selfie Group Discussion Assignment


“Selfies,” or self-taken photographs, have become as ubiquitous as the smartphone. Their popularity has even spurred the formation of an academic group, The Selfies Research Network. Your students take selfies, you probably do as well. But how do we encourage our students to think critically about the selfie as cultural artifact?

Mark C. Marino, associate professor (teaching) of Writing at the University of Southern California, came up with this admirable assignment titled “Know Thy Selfie”, in…