Tag Archives: students

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A Simple Way to Get Student Feedback Regularly

Longtime readers of ProfHackers might remember that I’m a fan of the simple solution: from putting labels on your stuff to carabiners for my keys to rubber bands around my dry erase markers to a multitool on my keyring to velcro ties around everything to a holster for my smartphone. I’m always looking for simple, relatively inexpensive solutions to everyday problems.

Recently, I’ve started doing something new in the classroom. It’s a simple little thing that I do every single time my class meet…

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Listening to Student Voices at Academic Events

students at MUN with headset

We rarely ever have student voices represented at academic conferences and events, and yet, when they are there, I often hear faculty and faculty developers feeling there should be more of these. I am talking about undergraduate students, not PhD students who have careers and present at conferences in their professional capacity. I have been in several conversations recently (mostly via Virtually Connecting at OpenEd16, OLC Accelerate and a missed conversation with David Wiley after OpenEd16). …

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Communicating with Students: A Suggestion About Email

Rendered three-dimensional @ symbol, here used to represent email.

Here at ProfHacker, we’ve written several posts about email over the years. I don’t know about you, but it feels like I receive way more email than I know what to do with. And regardless of who is sending them, a significant percentage of the emails that I do receive are, shall we say, constructed in a manner than is less than ideal: vague subject lines, announcements that include all important information in an image attachment, requests for information that take the sender 5 minutes to ask bu…

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Playing Cards in the Classroom for Student Collaboration

In my courses, I often put students into small, temporary groups for collaborative work that takes place in class or over the course of a few days. This work ranges from analysis of an assigned reading to researching a local issue to creating a digital resource to conducting an interview with a faculty or community member. We cover how to ensure effective collaboration and communication in small groups, including assigning and managing tasks (something for which an online tool like Basecamp can…

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A Bill of Rights for Student Collaborators

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One exciting aspect of digital humanities work is its openness to collaboration, including collaboration with students. As someone who used to coordinate an undergraduate research program, I’ve always been particularly excited about opportunities to involve students in meaningful research–and participating actively in an ongoing research project certainly counts!

But undergraduate participation in research also raises a whole host of thorny questions–around compensation, around acknowledgment, …

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Crowd-Sourcing Examinations

[Note: this post is adapted from part of a talk I recently gave to the NJEDge Annual Faculty Showcase.]

It’s no secret that we at ProfHacker like GoogleDocs. Ryan Cordell has used Google Docs to run a peer-review writing workshop, and George Williams has previously written about using GoogleDocs to take collaborative notes at conference sessions. Guest poster Thomas Burkholder wrote about using Google Forms. I have used all of these, and today I’m going to share yet another use: for compiling a…

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Basecamp Announces Free Accounts for Teachers

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Back in 2011, Heather wrote a great post about using the project management web service Basecamp for organizing student research. In 2012, however, Basecamp eliminated the option to maintain a free account, and their least expensive expensive paid plan is $20. That’s a perfectly understandable decision, of course, but for the individual teacher, the change might inspire a move to one of their competitors with free account options, such as Trello.

Well, if you’ve been holding back from using Bas…

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Students Talking About Technology: ECAR 2013

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The Educause Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) has released the latest version of its annual report, ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2013. I first started paying attention to ECAR about 5 or 6 years ago when I was at a school that participated in the survey. It’s a good study to participate in, because you get some more data points about how students use technology at your school–but even if your school doesn’t participate in the study, there are data poin…

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How to See All Your Students More Easily

eyeEach fall, as I prepare for my classes, I often think back to my first semester teaching, now 20 years ago. As a graduate student, I was fortunate to receive some excellent pedagogical training as part of my preparation to teach introductory writing classes. Although much of the week-long training was focused on the methods and content we were expected to use, some of the lessons that still stand out in my mind were about the basic elements of teaching that transcend discipline and subject matte…

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How to Have Two GV Numbers Connected with One Phone, and Why You Might Want To

ThiVoicemails isn’t the first post about Google Voice that we’ve run here at ProfHacker. Ryan’s written about it on at least three occasions. In one post, he explained how (in conjunction with FaceTime) he used it to keep in touch with his family while he was out of the country. He’s also used it to make long distance calls in places where cell coverage is poor.

The post that first got me intrigued about Google Voice, though, was Ryan’s introductory post on the service (can it really be three years ago a…