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David Boren Will Retire as U. of Oklahoma’s President

David L. Boren, president since 1994 of the University of Oklahoma, announced on Wednesday that he planned to retire on June 30, 2018, unless his successor had not been named by that date.

Mr. Boren, a centrist Democrat, has engaged in public service for more than 50 years, including terms in the Oklahoma Legislature, as governor of Oklahoma, and as a U.S. senator from his home state before he became the university’s president.

His years as president were noted for the creation of 30 academic pr…

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Laura Kipnis Says She Faced Another Title IX Investigation, This Time for Her Book

Laura Kipnis, the Northwestern University professor whose Chronicle article titled “Sexual Paranoia Strikes Academe” sparked a chain of events that led to a Title IX investigation of her, faced another inquiry, The New Yorker reports. That one was prompted by the publication of her book Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus, she said.

In her initial essay in The Chronicle, Ms. Kipnis argued that a culture of protection rather than empowerment around sexual issues on campuses was wro…

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Community-College Chief Will Step Down After Report Cites ‘Hostility, Intimidation, and Retaliation’

The president of Nashville State Community College has announced plans to retire in December, according to The Tennessean.

George Van Allen and other senior administrators were the subject of a “blistering” report earlier this year in which faculty members described a “climate of fear and oppressiveness” where university administrators used “hostility, intimidation, and retaliation” to control the faculty, the newspaper reported.

Mr. Van Allen has said the findings of the report were based on th…

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Editorial Board of ‘Third World Quarterly’ Resigns

All members of the Third World Quarterly’s editorial board have resigned over the publication of a controversial essay, according to the board’s resignation letter.

The essay is by Bruce Gilley, a political scientist at Portland State University, and is titled “The Case for Colonialism.” It argues that the idea that Western colonialism harmed colonized countries and their people is largely exaggerated.

The resignation letter states that the essay was published without consulting the editorial bo…

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Purdue’s Purchase of Kaplan Gets Go-Ahead From Education Dept.

The second of three approvals necessary for Purdue University to complete its acquisition of the for-profit Kaplan University has grown likelier now that the U.S. Education Department “preliminarily concluded” that it had no objections to the deal.

The department noted that final approval requires more information from the parties involved, and that conditions would be imposed. But Purdue announced confidently on Tuesday that the agency’s pre-acquisition review means that it “will give its appro…

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After Faculty Outcry, UNC Will Allow Athletics Course to Be Taught Again

Updated (9/19/2017, 8:01 p.m.) with more information about the university’s response to the claim that the course was canceled.

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill the history course “Big-Time College Sports and the Rights of Athletes, 1956 to the Present,” will once again be offered, in the spring semester of 2018. Jay Smith, the professor behind the course and a prominent critic of the administration, was informed last November that the course would be canceled for the fall of 2…

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Milo Yiannopoulos and Student Group Say Berkeley Is Trying to Derail ‘Free Speech Week’

The controversial speaker Milo Yiannopoulos and a student group accused the University of California at Berkeley on Monday of trying to cancel their plans for “Free Speech Week,” an event slated to feature Mr. Yiannopoulos, Stephen K. Bannon, President Trump’s former chief strategist, and others.

Mr. Yiannopoulos said the event, which is scheduled for September 24 to 27, would go on regardless. In a statement Mr. Yiannopoulos’s group said the university had raised bureaucratic and arbitrary ro…

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Georgia Tech Student Is Shot by Campus Police, Sending University Into Shock

Updated (9/18/2017, 10:46 p.m.) with word of violent protests and information from the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.

A knife-wielding student was shot and killed by the Georgia Institute of Technology’s police on Saturday night, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Scout Schultz, 21, was a computer-engineering student and president of the Georgia Tech Pride Alliance on the Atlanta campus. Disturbing video of the incident shows the student brandishing a knife or similar weapon while slo…

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Trump Administration Taps New Leader for Black-College Initiative

Johnathan Holifield, a consultant and former NFL player, has been appointed executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges, the White House announced at the opening ceremony of the annual black-college summit on Monday. News of Mr. Holifield’s appointment was first reported on Saturday by HBCU Digest.

Mr. Holifield will start on October 2, and his office will be housed in the White House, alongside a deputy director and an assistant, a Trump-administration offici…

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Cornell U. Announces Steps After Apparent Hate Crime

Cornell University is taking steps to “be a more equitable, inclusive, and welcoming university” after a student was hospitalized in what is being investigated as a possible hate crime, Martha E. Pollack, the university’s president, said in a written statement on Sunday.

On Friday a black student was physically assaulted and called racial slurs. One student was arrested in the incident, and several others, allegedly from a “currently unaffiliated fraternity” (Psi Upsilon), may have also been inv…