Category Archives: State Support for Higher Education

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Bill Would Bar U. of Wisconsin Employees From Working at Planned Parenthood

A new bill in the Wisconsin Legislature proposes barring a partnership that allows University of Wisconsin employees to work at Planned Parenthood, the Associated Press reports.

The measure targets the university’s decade-old arrangement with Planned Parenthood, through which faculty members work part time at a clinic in Madison, Wis. The bill would also prevent university employees from performing abortions or training students at facilities where abortions are performed, besides hospitals.

The…

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U. of Wisconsin System Proposes Merging 2-Year and 4-Year Colleges

The University of Wisconsin system wants to merge its 13 two-year colleges with its four-year institutions, according to the Wisconsin State Journal.

Under the proposal, each two-year institution would merge with one of seven four-year campuses. It’s not immediately clear what the proposed mergers would mean for jobs and programs at the two-year colleges. Ray W. Cross, the system’s president, said the plan would take effect in July 2018, pending approval in November by the Board of Regents.

The …

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Board Votes to Ban U. of North Carolina Civil-Rights Center From Litigating Cases

The University of North Carolina system’s Board of Governors voted on Friday to ban the UNC Law School’s Center for Civil Rights from litigating cases, the Associated Press reports.

The center performs legal work for minority and low-income groups, and has handled cases involving school desegregation and environmental justice.

Carol L. Folt, chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, wrote a letter in July to the board expressing support for the center’s litigation. Board mem…

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UC-Berkeley’s Former Chancellor Will Be Paid $434,000 on Leave

Nicholas B. Dirks, a former chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley, will be paid $434,000 during his coming year on leave, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Mr. Dirks announced in August 2016 that he would step down from his leadership position.

Under the university’s policy, Mr. Dirks qualifies for a year off with pay before returning to the classroom as a history professor. Executives must work in the university system for at least five years to receive full pay during a yea…

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U. of North Carolina Chancellor Criticizes Board’s Proposal to Hamstring Civil-Rights Center

Carol L. Folt, chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has publicly proclaimed her support for an embattled civil-rights center’s ability to pursue litigation, The News & Observer reports.

The university system’s Board of Governors is considering a proposal to prevent the UNC Law School’s Center for Civil Rights from engaging in any litigation. In the past, the center — which was founded in 2001 by the civil-rights lawyer Julius Chambers — has taken on cases involving …

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Does State Support Have ‘Weak’ Connection to Tuition? Association Begs to Differ

The American Association of State Colleges and Universities is arguing against the implications of a new report from the American Enterprise Institute about the relationship between state funding for higher education and rising tuition at public colleges and universities.

The report, “Pennies on the Dollar: The Surprisingly Weak Relationship Between State Subsidies and College Tuition,” says state disinvestment in higher education has played a small role in the increasing cost of tuition. And th…

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As New Threat Briefly Closes Evergreen State, Students Rip Legislation That Would Cut Its Funding

Updated (6/5/2017, 6:37 p.m.) with news of the campus’s reopening.

A student-government organization in Washington State on Monday condemned proposed legislation that would strip state funding from Evergreen State College, an institution embroiled in student protests and allegations of racism.

The statement was issued by the Washington Student Association, which represents college students statewide, on the same day that classes at Evergreen were canceled for a third weekday in a row so local l…

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University of California Will No Longer Pay for Regents’ Dinners and Parties

The University of California will no longer pick up the tab for dinners and parties thrown by the university’s Board of Regents, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The change in policy came hours after a report that the university had reimbursed regents to the tune of more than $225,000 for such events since 2012.

The regents threw parties and dinners at lavish hotels, the report said, and some of them were “poorly timed.” A recent event, which cost $270 a person on May 17, was held immediatel…

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New Mexico’s Public Colleges Breathe Easier, as Governor Signs Budget Bill

Gov. Susana Martinez of New Mexico signed into law on Friday a bill to provide state funds to public colleges and universities in the next fiscal year, nearly two months after her veto of a spending bill jeopardized such funding, according to the Albuquerque Journal.

The veto, of nearly $745 million in support for higher education, appeared to cast New Mexico as the next fiscal battleground, after Illinois, in which a  deadlock between a Republican governor and a Democratic legislature resulted…

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U. of Maine Approves a Restructuring of Its Presque Isle Campus

Trustees of the University of Maine system took another step on Sunday toward streamlining operations and reducing costs by approving a reorganization of the University of Maine at Presque Isle, the Portland Press Herald reports.

The campus, like many regional public institutions across the country, has seen enrollment shrink and has struggled to close budget gaps in recent years. With about 1,300 students, Presque Isle is the second-smallest campus in the Maine system. Under the reorganization,…