Category Archives: Legal

Higher education in the courtroom.

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Mexican Immigrant May Be First DACA Participant Arrested Under Trump

Federal authorities have arrested a 23-year-old Mexican immigrant who was brought to the United States illegally as a child and who might be the first participant in an Obama-era program for such immigrants to be detained since President Trump took office, reported the Reuters news agency.

In a tweet on Tuesday evening, the National Immigration Law Center called the news “unacceptable and horrifying.”

The immigrant, Daniel Ramirez Medina, has a 3-year-old child and no criminal record. He was det…

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Stanford U. Says Lawyer Was Not Dismissed Over Criticism

Responding to several news articles about Stanford University’s Title IX cases, the university released a Q&A with Lauren Schoenthaler, senior associate vice provost, about the adjudication process.

On February 9, The New York Times reported that Stanford had dismissed Crystal Riggins, a lawyer who had been hired to help students while they pursued sexual-assault complaints. The Times reported that Ms. Riggins had been fired for criticizing the university’s adjudication process to the newspaper.

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17 Universities Join N.Y. Legal Challenge to Trump Immigration Ban

Seventeen universities filed a brief on Monday supporting a court challenge to President Trump’s executive order on immigration.

“While the executive order is currently limited to seven countries, its damaging effects have already been widely felt by American universities,” the amicus brief says. “When the executive order went into effect, the 90-day suspension of entry left some of amici’s students, faculty, and scholars stranded abroad, while others were unable to leave the United States to tr…

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Appeals Court Declines to Reinstate Trump’s Travel Ban

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Thursday declined to reinstate President Trump’s executive order calling for a travel ban that affected roughly 17,000 students on American campuses.

Mr. Trump’s order, issued last month, suspended for 90 days the entry into the United States of citizens of seven largely Muslim countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. It also suspended for 120 days the admission into the United States of all refug…

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Jury Awards $2.5 Million to Ex-Employee at UC-Riverside in Gender-Bias Case

A jury has ordered the University of California to pay a former employee on its Riverside campus $2.5 million for violating state law when it fired her after she reported gender discrimination, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Michele Coyle, who was chief campus counsel until 2012, filed a civil complaint in 2015 alleging that she and other female staff members had been the victims of “rampant gender discrimination” by the university’s executive vice chancellor at the time, Dallas M. Rabenstein.

T…

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Lawyer Who Worked on Rape Cases for Stanford Is Dismissed Over Criticism

A lawyer retained by Stanford University to represent students making sexual-assault complaints has been dismissed after telling The New York Times about her frustrations with the university’s process, the newspaper reports.

Crystal Riggins was one of six lawyers that Stanford held on retainer to guide students involved in complaints filed under the federal gender-equity law known as Title IX. On January 31, Ms. Riggins received an email saying that her services would no longer be needed followi…

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U. of California Will Pay Student $1.15 Million to Settle Sexual-Assault Suit

The University of California system has agreed to pay $1.15 million to a former student on the Santa Cruz campus who said that she had been raped by a professor, in one of the largest individual settlements of a campus sexual-assault case.

Luz Portillo, the former student, told BuzzFeed News that she was raped by the professor in June 2015, the day before her graduation. She said she immediately reported the assault to the campus office that handles Title IX violations and to the police. Ms. Po…

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Why Colleges’ Pledges to Shield Data on International Students Don’t Mean Much

President Trump’s executive order to bar all refugees from entering the United States, as well as citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries, had college leaders scrambling over the weekend to respond.

Many colleges released statements saying they would not turn over confidential student records to law-enforcement agencies beyond the federal government’s current requirement. For example, in a written statement, Richard H. Brodhead, Duke’s president, said, “Duke University cannot and will no…

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Court Denies Regent of U. of Texas Full Access to Admissions Records

The Texas Supreme Court on Friday ruled against Wallace L. Hall Jr., a University of Texas regent, in his attempt to force the system’s chancellor to turn over records containing admissions information.

Because the university system’s governance structure gives the chancellor, William H. McRaven, ultimate “discretionary legal determination,” he did not exceed his authority in denying Mr. Hall complete access to records, the court ruled in Mr. Hall’s lawsuit.

“In this suit we are simply tasked wi…

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Judge Sides With U. of Kentucky in Fight Over Openness and Privacy

[Updated (1/24/2017, 3:40 p.m.) with additional details and reaction.]

A Kentucky Circuit Court judge has ruled in favor of the University of Kentucky in its lawsuit against the university’s student newspaper, which had been seeking records regarding sexual-assault allegations against a professor.

Judge Thomas L. Clark found that the investigation file involving the professor, James D. Harwood, was protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Mr. Harwood, an associate professor…