Category Archives: Admissions

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College Board Seeks to Tighten SAT Security Worldwide

The College Board, which owns the SAT, is taking steps to strengthen security following a wave of cheating and test stealing, the Associated Press reports.

In moves that will be formally announced on Wednesday, the New York-based company hopes to prevent leaks and dissuade potential cheaters. Planned reforms include cutting back on the number of international testing dates from six to four, communicating with law-enforcement agencies about people suspected of stealing test materials, and increas…

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Fafsa Changes May Prompt Colleges to Shift Admissions Cycles Earlier

A new study has found that more than two-thirds of colleges plan to make significant changes in the enrollment process because of new rules taking effect this fall for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, known as the Fafsa. The new policies, championed by President Obama, will allow applicants to submit the Fafsa as early as October and use tax data from two years prior, known as “prior-prior year” data. (Until now, students could use tax data only from the previous year.)

Those altera…

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Black Students Are Among the Least-Prepared for College, Report Says

African-American students’ college readiness is lagging compared with that of other underrepresented students, according to a new report released on Monday by ACT and the United Negro College Fund. Sixty-two percent of African-American students who graduated from high school in 2014 and took the ACT met none of the organization’s four benchmarks that measure college readiness, which was twice the rate for all students.

“To help African-American students, we need to improve the quality of educati…

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Among Students Bound for College, Confusion Persists on Paying for It

Report: “studentPOLL”

Organizations: Art & Science Group and ACT

Summary: The latest iteration of “studentPOLL” asked a national sample of college-bound students who had taken the ACT about paying for college. The survey was conducted in February, after students had applied to college but before most admissions and financial-aid decisions had been made. Among other things, the survey found that:

  • Three-quarters of respondents agreed that rising college costs were out of control.
  • More than a thir…
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Diversity Declined at Medical Schools Barred From Considering Applicants’ Race

Report: “Racial Diversity in the Medical Profession: The Impact of Affirmative Action Bans on Underrepresented Student of Color Matriculation in Medical Schools”

Authors: Liliana M. Garces, assistant professor of higher education at Pennsylvania State University at University Park, and David Mickey-Pabello, doctoral student in sociology at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Summary: The study, published in the March/April issue of The Journal of Higher Education, attempts to gauge how medic…

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All Students Should Receive Federal Money for College, Report Proposes

Report: “Strengthening Our Economy Through College for All”

Authors: David A. Bergeron, vice president for postsecondary education, and Carmel Martin, executive vice president for policy, both at the Center for American Progress

Organization: Center for American Progress

Summary: This report is the first in what will be a series of policy recommendations on how best to break down barriers to higher education through changes in the federal student-aid system.

The initial report lays out the cente…

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U. of Texas President Influenced Admissions and Hid the Truth, Report Says

[Updated (2/12/2015, 1:51 p.m.) with a link to the full report.]

An independent investigation has found that the president of the University of Texas at Austin, William C. Powers Jr., improperly influenced the university’s admissions process and then misled lawyers looking into the matter, The Dallas Morning News reports.

The newspaper obtained a copy of a report commissioned by the recently departed system chancellor, Francisco G. Cigarroa, and conducted by the firm Kroll Associates Inc. Among…

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CUNY Disputes Magazine’s Account of Minority Students’ Admissions Hurdles

The City University of New York has some serious bones to pick with an article in The Atlantic magazine that initially billed itself as an exposé of the difficulties minority students face in getting into the system’s colleges.

For example, the original text of the article (it has since been changed) said many applicants found themselves “locked out of the City University of New York,” according to the system’s written response to the article. The response, a letter written by the system’s senio…

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College Enrollments Drop for 3rd Straight Year

Report: “Postsecondary Student Enrollments Continue Decline”

Organization: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center

Summary: College enrollments dropped by 1.3 percent this fall after slipping 1.5 percent last fall and 1.8 percent in the fall of 2012.

  • For the public sector over all, the decline was 1.5 percent, with two-year colleges down 3.4 percent and four-year colleges up 0.4 percent. (Those categories have been shifting as more community colleges offer four-year degrees.)
  • The for-pro…
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High Schools’ Average Incomes Predict College Enrollment, Study Finds

Report: “High School Benchmarks Report: National College Progression Rates”

Organization: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center

Summary: Students who graduate from high schools with low average income levels remain less likely to enroll in college than do their counterparts from schools with higher average incomes.

The report divides public, non-charter high schools according to three characteristics: income level, percentage of minority students, and locale. Of those factors, income le…