Category Archives: Teaching

News from inside the classroom.

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Grad Student Sounds Alarms Over Penn’s Response to Online Attacks

Updated (10/19/2017, 4:52 p.m.) with statement from the university.

A graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania said administrators pulled them from the classroom over the use of a teaching technique, according to a set of messages on Twitter.

Stephanie McKellop, who uses they/them pronouns, wrote in a series of posts that are set to private that the university was going to condemn McKellop for using progressive stacking, a method aimed at offering marginalized students a greater chan…

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Bill Would Bar U. of Wisconsin Employees From Working at Planned Parenthood

A new bill in the Wisconsin Legislature proposes barring a partnership that allows University of Wisconsin employees to work at Planned Parenthood, the Associated Press reports.

The measure targets the university’s decade-old arrangement with Planned Parenthood, through which faculty members work part time at a clinic in Madison, Wis. The bill would also prevent university employees from performing abortions or training students at facilities where abortions are performed, besides hospitals.

The…

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Instructors, Did You Ever Cheat When You Were a Student?

Cheating is wrong, right? Well, that’s what we’d like to talk about with you.

If you’re a college instructor, there’s a good chance that you’re now in a position to make or enforce rules about plagiarism and other forms of cheating. But months, years, or decades ago, when you were on the other side of the lectern, did you ever engage in academic misconduct?

Fill out the form below to tell us more. Rest assured that The Chronicle will not publish or otherwise disseminate any information you submi…

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Western Governors U. Might Have to Repay $700 Million in Student Aid

After an audit of Western Governors University, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General has concluded the university was ineligible to award financial aid to its students and should return more than $700 million to the government.

For more, see this Chronicle article.

As part of its decision, the office is recommending that the Department of Education require the nonprofit university to return $712,670,616 in federal Title IV financial-aid funds distributed to Western Gove…

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Marygrove College to Eliminate All Undergraduate Programs

Experiencing enrollment and financial problems like other liberal-arts colleges across the country, Marygrove College announced on Wednesday that it would discard all of its undergraduate programs this winter, the Detroit Free Press reports.

“Vigorous marketing and recruitment efforts have failed to provide sufficient revenue from our undergraduate programs to continue operations as usual,” the Michigan college’s president, Elizabeth A. Burns, said in a news release. To keep the institution viab…

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UC-Berkeley’s Former Chancellor Will Be Paid $434,000 on Leave

Nicholas B. Dirks, a former chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley, will be paid $434,000 during his coming year on leave, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Mr. Dirks announced in August 2016 that he would step down from his leadership position.

Under the university’s policy, Mr. Dirks qualifies for a year off with pay before returning to the classroom as a history professor. Executives must work in the university system for at least five years to receive full pay during a yea…

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U. of North Carolina Chancellor Criticizes Board’s Proposal to Hamstring Civil-Rights Center

Carol L. Folt, chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has publicly proclaimed her support for an embattled civil-rights center’s ability to pursue litigation, The News & Observer reports.

The university system’s Board of Governors is considering a proposal to prevent the UNC Law School’s Center for Civil Rights from engaging in any litigation. In the past, the center — which was founded in 2001 by the civil-rights lawyer Julius Chambers — has taken on cases involving …

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Nashville State Is Accused of Spying on Investigation of Its Oppressive Climate

Nashville State Community College maintains such an oppressive climate for its faculty members that it sought to monitor and interfere with efforts to ask them about it, according to a report commissioned by the Tennessee Board of Regents.

Nashville State’s executives sought to surreptitiously identify which faculty members were being confidentially interviewed by investigators from Middle Tennessee State University. Several administrators, including George H. Van Allen, the college’s presid…

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Mills College Declares Financial Emergency and May Cut 30 to 35 Jobs

Mills College, a liberal-arts institution for women in Oakland, Calif., declared a financial emergency on Tuesday as a first step toward dealing with financial challenges, including a projected $9.1-million deficit in the coming fiscal year.

In a news release and in a statement emailed to faculty, staff, and students on Tuesday afternoon, the college described the Board of Trustees’ approval of the declaration of emergency as a step that authorizes Mills to restructure all of its expenses in p…

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Students Don’t Always Recognize Good Teaching, Study Finds

Effective teaching has a lasting impact on students but is rarely recognized in their course evaluations, according to an analysis, released on Tuesday, of nearly 340,000 mathematics students at the University of Phoenix.

A skilled instructor affected his or her students’ performance in a course on a scale equal to moving their grade from a B to a B-plus, say researchers at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in a report on their study, “Measuring Up: Assessing Instructor Effectiveness in Hi…