• March 29, 2017
March 29, 2017, 3:22:47 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please Log In to participate in forums.
News: Talk about how to cope with chronic illness, disability, and other health issues in the academic workplace.
 
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 35
  Print  
Author Topic: Stupid CV Tricks  (Read 220549 times)
case_insensitive
Indefatigable Maverick Giver of Gold Stars and Ever-So Slightly
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 12,310

Life is an endurance race. Pace yourself.


« Reply #30 on: June 20, 2007, 3:40:53 pm »

I hear you, vardahilwen. However, I do know that SCs want to know all the details, particularly if it shows your timeline of relevant education and relevant employment. Of course, I also stand by the statement that if you have done a lot of stuff since the BS, then the BS isn't very relevant anyhow.
Logged

Director of the CHE MYOB Professional Development Program,
An initiative of the CHE STFU Center for Professional Development.
Chairperson of the GAB CPE Series.
case_insensitive
Indefatigable Maverick Giver of Gold Stars and Ever-So Slightly
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 12,310

Life is an endurance race. Pace yourself.


« Reply #31 on: June 20, 2007, 3:42:43 pm »

1, This past job cycle we received a significant number (not overwhelming, but enough to be a concern) of cvs that for some reason break everything down according to year rather than by category.

That just boggles my mind. Why would anyone do that?  I think they violated my rule for having other folks read over the CV before sending it out!  That's just plain weird (and unhelpful!).
Logged

Director of the CHE MYOB Professional Development Program,
An initiative of the CHE STFU Center for Professional Development.
Chairperson of the GAB CPE Series.
vardahilwen
One of the cool kids
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,968


« Reply #32 on: June 20, 2007, 3:43:57 pm »

I think there are fads or trends in how the CV is laid out.  I've heard a lot of conflicting advice on how to categorize things.
Logged

You can sit at my lunch table.
georgia_guy
Sardonic
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,271


« Reply #33 on: June 20, 2007, 3:44:09 pm »

  What is wrong with only listing the date of the PhD?  Why does the search committee need to know that I got my bachelor's in the '80's?  Again, I'm genuinely trying to understand, and appreciate your input on these matters.

I believe a CV (or resume) needs to be both transparent and complete. Transparent means you give dates for degrees, dates for jobs held, your citizenship (or immigration status), and so on.  Complete means you fill in any gaps in your education or employment background. (At least briefly.)  A CV that is not transparent and complete just raises doubts in my mind.




I agree on the dates thing. Leaving them off would raise an eyebrow. Particularly, I would be likely to view it as an attempt to hide employment gaps, which can indicate all kinds of problems. However, on the employment status issue, I would say wait until the information is asked for.

I typically recommend not mentioning nationality or employment status (applying kind of implies you will be able to take the job), marriage status, children, age, race, disability or any other factor which may lead to discrimination on a resume. As far as personal interests go, if they are related to your field in some way (a geologist who enjoys spelunking) perhaps it's worth mentioning. Otherwise, it just distracts, and appears to be filler. This may vary widely by field. I am in a business college, so having interesting hobbies really doesn't matter. I suppose that it might be a different case for someone teaching creative writing.
Logged

I'm the bad guy? How'd that happen
case_insensitive
Indefatigable Maverick Giver of Gold Stars and Ever-So Slightly
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 12,310

Life is an endurance race. Pace yourself.


« Reply #34 on: June 20, 2007, 3:46:13 pm »

I think there are fads or trends in how the CV is laid out.  I've heard a lot of conflicting advice on how to categorize things.

I think mine's been mostly the same, in terms of categories, for nearly two decades. Though, of course, the research part is more primary now than it was when I was a PhD student looking for a job who had only one publication and a dissertation in progress.

But, I'm an accountant. We aren't too creative, you know. :o)
Logged

Director of the CHE MYOB Professional Development Program,
An initiative of the CHE STFU Center for Professional Development.
Chairperson of the GAB CPE Series.
catnip
Look! Suddenly I'm a
Member
***
Posts: 136

Look at me, a 3-star forumite!


« Reply #35 on: June 20, 2007, 3:50:32 pm »

[soapbox]

Ok, I'm so over the staple comments that I want to finally share what I do with materials. A mentor suggested the following, and I have "obeyed" with favorable results.

1. Make sure your name is on each page of anything you send. Easy enough to do with Word these days.
2. On fabulous white linen resume paper, I print all primary documents and staple anything with 2+ pages.
3. Compilation of packet:
     a. Right side: originals
     b. Left side: copies of originals on plain paper, with a cover page on that side with the title "Materials for Committee Photocopying" (seriously)

I've never heard complaints, only comments from SC's about how professional the package looks and how easy it was to use.

I generally have not been asked to send writing samples, syllabi, etc. until after the first round, so this idea has worked nicely for me.

But I won't need to use it next year!....

Long live the staple!!!  But seriously, the most important things are to be 1) clear, 2) consistent, 3) factual, 4) thorough, and 5) make the package SC-friendly.

[/soap box]
Logged

Get 'nipped!
case_insensitive
Indefatigable Maverick Giver of Gold Stars and Ever-So Slightly
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 12,310

Life is an endurance race. Pace yourself.


« Reply #36 on: June 20, 2007, 3:54:56 pm »

[soapbox]

Ok, I'm so over the staple comments that I want to finally share what I do with materials. A mentor suggested the following, and I have "obeyed" with favorable results.

1. Make sure your name is on each page of anything you send. Easy enough to do with Word these days.
2. On fabulous white linen resume paper, I print all primary documents and staple anything with 2+ pages.
3. Compilation of packet:
     a. Right side: originals
     b. Left side: copies of originals on plain paper, with a cover page on that side with the title "Materials for Committee Photocopying" (seriously)

I've never heard complaints, only comments from SC's about how professional the package looks and how easy it was to use.

I generally have not been asked to send writing samples, syllabi, etc. until after the first round, so this idea has worked nicely for me.

But I won't need to use it next year!....

Long live the staple!!!  But seriously, the most important things are to be 1) clear, 2) consistent, 3) factual, 4) thorough, and 5) make the package SC-friendly.

[/soap box]

In general, that all sounds like good advice (though in my field, anyone printing on any special paper would look suspect -- I know that's not true in other fields).

clear, consistent, concise (i'll add one), factual, etc.  Very good.
Logged

Director of the CHE MYOB Professional Development Program,
An initiative of the CHE STFU Center for Professional Development.
Chairperson of the GAB CPE Series.
case_insensitive
Indefatigable Maverick Giver of Gold Stars and Ever-So Slightly
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 12,310

Life is an endurance race. Pace yourself.


« Reply #37 on: June 20, 2007, 3:55:41 pm »

  What is wrong with only listing the date of the PhD?  Why does the search committee need to know that I got my bachelor's in the '80's?  Again, I'm genuinely trying to understand, and appreciate your input on these matters.

I believe a CV (or resume) needs to be both transparent and complete. Transparent means you give dates for degrees, dates for jobs held, your citizenship (or immigration status), and so on.  Complete means you fill in any gaps in your education or employment background. (At least briefly.)  A CV that is not transparent and complete just raises doubts in my mind.

I agree. I don't care how old you are but I do care if you are not being transparent.
Logged

Director of the CHE MYOB Professional Development Program,
An initiative of the CHE STFU Center for Professional Development.
Chairperson of the GAB CPE Series.
my2cents
Member
***
Posts: 173


« Reply #38 on: June 20, 2007, 4:16:34 pm »

Wait a minute here...! I'm really confused about this citizenship issue! I'm a Canadian, currently working in Canada. Thus, if I were to apply to a job in the US, do you mean to say, that I should now state "Eligible for H-1 visa or green card" on my CV?! That would most certainly disqualify me for most positions... as people think it is a terrible hassle to get a visa, and would simply junk my application in the paper stage....

I have read the posting on it a while back http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,38470.0.html, but it seems to only confirm my suspicions. If you are selected for the job, as the best candidate, neither gender, race, marital status, sexual orientation, nor nationality should bar you from getting the job. That is discrimination, plain and simple.

Your job eligibility status is the concern of HR, not of the search committee. In the same way that your benefits plan -- e.g. your same-sex partner as dependant -- is the concern of HR, not the search committee. Thus it has no place on your CV. In the same way that gender, race, marital status, sexual orientation have no place on a CV.

Addendum:
In Canada, priority in some jobs is given to Canadians; however, this is rendered absolutely explicit in job postings, which clearly state "priority will be given to Canadian citizens, landed immigrants, women (or sometimes men), people with disabilities and First Nations" -- to prevent any lawsuits. If no suitable Canadian candidate is found, the job will go to the most suitable foreign applicant.

My American colleagues always sneered at this form of discrimination - however, you are now telling me that it exists in the US as well... Is this correct?
Logged
tenured_cat
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,730


« Reply #39 on: June 20, 2007, 8:54:58 pm »

While discrimination by national origin is prohibited, discrimination by nationality is not - meaning that if you are a visa-holder (or about to be), your future employer must document that there were no better American candidates for the job. Permanent residents are exempt from this (we are considered second-class almost-citizens), but personal opinions of "fit" (or good old fascism) make their appearance all the time.

That said, my CV states very clearly, under the heading "Nationalities" in which country I hold citizenship and that I am a permanent resident here. It may, initially, not be required (HR will need your paperwork of work eligibility just a few days after signing the contract), but I prefer to let people know right away. After all, there are people who think that only the local oh 5% of humanity are truly worthy and that nobody should ever be allowed to move more than 5m from their place of birth - better find out right away if you're dealing with such folks.
Logged

"Thousands of years ago, cats were worshipped as gods. Cats have never forgotten this." - Anonymous
vardahilwen
One of the cool kids
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,968


« Reply #40 on: June 20, 2007, 9:10:38 pm »

While discrimination by national origin is prohibited, discrimination by nationality is not - meaning that if you are a visa-holder (or about to be), your future employer must document that there were no better American candidates for the job. Permanent residents are exempt from this (we are considered second-class almost-citizens), but personal opinions of "fit" (or good old fascism) make their appearance all the time.

It may also depend on where the school is located.  I worked at a U near the border, and the HR department routinely dealt with getting work visas for Canadians, it wasn't considered a big deal.
Logged

You can sit at my lunch table.
zharkov
or, the modern Prometheus.
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 9,524


« Reply #41 on: June 20, 2007, 9:50:27 pm »

In Canada, priority in some jobs is given to Canadians; however, this is rendered absolutely explicit in job postings, which clearly state "priority will be given to Canadian citizens, landed immigrants, women (or sometimes men), people with disabilities and First Nations" -- to prevent any lawsuits. If no suitable Canadian candidate is found, the job will go to the most suitable foreign applicant.

My American colleagues always sneered at this form of discrimination - however, you are now telling me that it exists in the US as well... Is this correct?

In theory, the US H1B visa system is supposed to be for cases where a suitable American citizen cannot be had; in practice, it is much looser than that, or at least as I've seen it implemented.

In an ideal world, there would be an international labor market where I, as an American, could go to work in Canada or the UK or Hong Kong as easily as I can go to work in the next state over.  But it doesn't work that way, and maybe never will.

Logged

__________
Zharkov's Razor:
Adapting Zharkov a bit to this situation, ignorance and confusion can explain a lot.
technicallycreative
New member
*
Posts: 5


« Reply #42 on: June 20, 2007, 10:41:49 pm »

And if female please also note if you plan to become pregnant. Not really discussed on SCs, but can create an HR headache down the road.

Are you serious? That is totally ridiculous. How many job offers do think a female would get if they *noted* that they plan to become pregnant.  (BTW just b/c you plan doesn’t mean it will happen in your desired timeframe)   Should one also note how hard or frequently that they are trying to get pregnant?
Logged

Oh… serious one
vardahilwen
One of the cool kids
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,968


« Reply #43 on: June 20, 2007, 10:51:15 pm »

And if female please also note if you plan to become pregnant. Not really discussed on SCs, but can create an HR headache down the road.

Are you serious? That is totally ridiculous. How many job offers do think a female would get if they *noted* that they plan to become pregnant.  (BTW just b/c you plan doesn’t mean it will happen in your desired timeframe)   Should one also note how hard or frequently that they are trying to get pregnant?

Oh yes, that too.
I believe this was an attempt at irony, oh serious one ;)
Logged

You can sit at my lunch table.
medprof
I'm just a
Member
***
Posts: 194


« Reply #44 on: June 20, 2007, 10:51:48 pm »

And if female please also note if you plan to become pregnant. Not really discussed on SCs, but can create an HR headache down the road.

Are you serious? That is totally ridiculous. How many job offers do think a female would get if they *noted* that they plan to become pregnant.  (BTW just b/c you plan doesn’t mean it will happen in your desired timeframe)   Should one also note how hard or frequently that they are trying to get pregnant?

Gently,

I think that comment was tongue firmly in cheek. Though if you want to tell us how frequently you are trying, we would listen :) We could even start a new thread for you!!
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 35
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.