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Author Topic: Never hearing from the SC.  (Read 4901 times)
holdthresh
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« on: November 06, 2007, 3:32:58 pm »

Last year, I sent out several applications that I never heard anything about.  Since someone was hired, I did not feel the need to follow up, but it did irritate me that some SC's did not have the courtesy to even send rejection letters.  Does this happen to many people?  It seems so rude at our level of training. 
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sugaree
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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2007, 3:55:45 pm »

This happens every year I've applied for jobs - a few schools of the batch never bother to reject me. I too think it's rude, but it's also pretty standard so it doesn't really bother me anymore. Their loss....
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larryc
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2007, 4:16:44 pm »

It is rude, it does happen a lot, don't take it personally. Just promise yourself that when you are on the search committee that you will do better.
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I can be happy anywhere I have a little money and the cops aren't after me--I'm still searching for this place.
klausk
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2007, 5:11:10 pm »

This shows that why one can easily argue that universities are the least efficient & the least professional organizations in the U.S. 

It's just wrong not to promptly inform candidates of decisions. My current university never does that. I once asked my department search committee chair to inform candidates. His reply: "I never heard from many schools when I was on the market. Why should I waste my time?" 
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pphillipp
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2007, 5:34:15 pm »

Quote
His reply: "I never heard from many schools when I was on the market. Why should I waste my time?" 

Respect and common decency.  Two of the things we would expect from our students.

If you're not willing to GIVE it, don't expect it in return.
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dr_stones
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2007, 5:38:32 pm »

Well, you know, you send rejection letters and then no one writes back . . .
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apablo
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« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2007, 6:24:28 pm »

From what I recall there was only one SC out of 35 or so that never sent me a rejection letter. Oddly enough, they were one of the handful with whom I had  conference interviews (and they seemed really enthusiastic during the interview), and of all the SCs I interviewed with they were the most professionally organized and "HR-oriented." Until it comes to rejection time, I guess.
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daurousseau
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« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2007, 6:37:09 pm »

Last year, I sent out several applications that I never heard anything about.  Since someone was hired, I did not feel the need to follow up, but it did irritate me that some SC's did not have the courtesy to even send rejection letters.  Does this happen to many people?  It seems so rude at our level of training. 

I'd say it's the norm. Just one many degredations you will face. Like walking home in the rain when the buses aren't running.  Fluff it off, open a cool one, put your feet up.

It's nothing compared to the rudeness and backstabbing once you get hired.

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noodledow
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« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2007, 6:43:42 pm »

My success rate was about 50% for the rejection letters on my first TT search.  I was a post-doc at the time, and made a 'wall of shame' in my office on which I stapled all the letters.  You always know how much money a school has when they send you a rejection letter on  paper fancier than your application was printed on.
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arts4ever
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« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2007, 8:00:46 pm »

You know, I've never been at a school where the SC actually had a THING to do with the letters: that's all been handled by HR. We're told in no uncertain terms to stay out of that side of things because there is a mechanism in place to do that for the search, but what actually happens after that, I've never known specifically.
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forcryingoutloud
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« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2007, 9:11:47 pm »

Be careful what you wish for.  Many searches have ended without my hearing a thing (including the time I was one of two finalists).  Then there was the Harvard department that rejected me twice for the same search in 2005.  The committee head wrote me in March and the department chair in August (perhaps to make sure that I really understood).
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You have to know how to accept rejection and reject acceptance--Ray Bradbury

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case_insensitive
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« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2007, 9:14:01 pm »

Last year, I sent out several applications that I never heard anything about.  Since someone was hired, I did not feel the need to follow up, but it did irritate me that some SC's did not have the courtesy to even send rejection letters.  Does this happen to many people?  It seems so rude at our level of training. 

Unfortunately, this is not unusual. Over the course of about 20 years, I've applied for and earned a number of jobs and, frankly, more schools have not followed up than have sent rejection letters. This includes applications for chaired positions for which I had campus interviews.

The good news is that you don't really want to work for places that will treat you like that.
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case_insensitive
Indefatigable Maverick Giver of Gold Stars and Ever-So Slightly
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Life is an endurance race. Pace yourself.


« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2007, 9:15:08 pm »

You know, I've never been at a school where the SC actually had a THING to do with the letters: that's all been handled by HR. We're told in no uncertain terms to stay out of that side of things because there is a mechanism in place to do that for the search, but what actually happens after that, I've never known specifically.

I'm sure this is different from school to school and perhaps from discipline to discipline. In my experience, only in my field, of course, the SC chair and/or dept head are responsible for the rejection letters. This may be a weirdness in my field, but of course, we don't have huge applicant pools, generally.
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Chairperson of the GAB CPE Series.
apablo
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« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2007, 9:23:21 pm »

Be careful what you wish for.  Many searches have ended without my hearing a thing (including the time I was one of two finalists).  Then there was the Harvard department that rejected me twice for the same search in 2005.  The committee head wrote me in March and the department chair in August (perhaps to make sure that I really understood).

A friend received four -- FOUR -- rejection letters, spaced out over the course of a month or two, from the same department. I guess they wanted to make sure he got the message.
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innyc
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« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2007, 10:17:25 pm »

I actually think universities send rejection letters more often than many businesses.  Friends who apply to jobs outside of academia say they never expect to get anything, no acknowledgment letter, no letter of rejection.  In my brief period of working before going into academia, this seemed true.  Universities should be better and do better, but I think the comparison to efficient, polite business is a false one.

In both universities and in business, though, I do think there's a reasonable expectation that if the employer contacts you (more materials, interview, etc.) they owe you the courtesy of telling you when they have completed their process.
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