• March 23, 2017

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March 23, 2017, 10:21:37 am *
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News: Talk about how to cope with chronic illness, disability, and other health issues in the academic workplace.
 
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 21 
 on: Today at 12:44:19 am 
Started by shepd117 - Last post by daniel_von_flanagan
Depends on your definition of "better". If you mean "better teacher", you'd be correct in a research university, but a professor who is good at getting grants generates a lot more revenue than they cost.
This depends on how you do the accounting.  Grant revenue is not fungible, and while the value to the institution and the state of big grants is indeniable,  it still requires extra revenue from elsewhere in the institution to service the grant, so if the general funding of a university is tight then a researcher with a big grant will end up sucking resources out of other parts of campus, often off the backs of undergradutes.  This has been exhaustively studied, especially since the 2008 crash, by people like Chris Newfield.  This excellent blog post (and the earlier one it references) explains some aspects of the problem.

The bottom line is that a researcher in a research university with good grant support is serving the fundamental mission of the institution, and should be proud of the work they are doing, but they are not self-supporting no matter how big the grant or how high the negotiated overhead rate.  (Nor should they be!)  - DvF

 22 
 on: Yesterday at 11:37:58 pm 
Started by shepd117 - Last post by mouseman
1) Since professors are cost centers, and a better professor doesn't generate any more revenue than a worse professor, the perceived value of the candidate is irrelevant.  In fact, as far as I can tell, salaries for most academic positions are very close to non-negotiable.


Depends on your definition of "better". If you mean "better teacher", you'd be correct in a research university, but a professor who is good at getting grants generates a lot more revenue than they cost. My wife has brought in a lot more money in grants than she gets in salary, while some other professors have not. So there is a difference in revenue generation (since the University keeps a large chunk of every research grant). In a teaching school, a good professor can increase retention and enrollment, thus generating more revenue than a professor who does not.

Salaries are very negotiable, especially in private schools and research universities. Look at the salaries of the different assistant professors that were hire the same year in a public school, and you can see differences, sometimes substantial ones.

 23 
 on: Yesterday at 11:23:30 pm 
Started by shepd117 - Last post by quasihumanist
1) Since professors are cost centers, and a better professor doesn't generate any more revenue than a worse professor, the perceived value of the candidate is irrelevant.  In fact, as far as I can tell, salaries for most academic positions are very close to non-negotiable.

2) I refuse to lie when negotiating, and I seriously lose respect for anyone (from either side) who does.  I know this would never hold up in the private sector.  When I left the private sector, I vowed to never work in a position of any power in the private sector ever again.


 24 
 on: Yesterday at 11:22:27 pm 
Started by fishbrains - Last post by mouseman
The Mouselet was in Brownies and Girl Scouts. I was not invited to any of the camps. Thank the gods.

<Waves happily to Bioteacher>

 25 
 on: Yesterday at 11:20:16 pm 
Started by yeahright - Last post by mouseman

"Washed a pot of tea, free to choose a sit down, or indoors, or water Xuan, or pavilion, deep breathing a mouthful, accompanied by tea inhalation moist, instantly only know that fragrant, tea, green incense, leaves incense , The air incense ... ... intoxicated! "

Enuf said

 26 
 on: Yesterday at 10:49:27 pm 
Started by itried - Last post by cmeagher7
Congratulations! It's a great feeling.

 27 
 on: Yesterday at 10:49:23 pm 
Started by almond - Last post by almond
I'm trying to find salary data for Assistant Professors at UT Chattanooga. I've gone to this site
https://www.tbr.edu/hr/salaries
and
https://apps.tn.gov/salary-app/search.html
but I've had no luck!

I found a PDF on their site: https://www.utc.edu/human-resources/compensation-payroll/
but this isn't what I want.  I'm looking for public data for a specific department.

Where can I find this data?
Isn't UTC part of the TN Board of Regents?

 28 
 on: Yesterday at 10:38:53 pm 
Started by History125 - Last post by tuxedo_cat
I should add that he's defending next month--the dissertation isn't really an issue, it's just research and trying to publish more that will be the issue. The VAP position does have guaranteed funding for travel and a research grant, so that's nice.

Oh, that's great!   You're right, however, that getting more publications out or--even better––a book contract should still be a priority.  If the number of years offered is different, that would be another big reason to choose one over the other.  Time for research still matters more than money, I would say.  History is perhaps the most brutal of the humanities fields job-marketwise (my casual observation), and having a book contract at a well-regarded press would clearly be a huge advantage.  Good luck!

 29 
 on: Yesterday at 10:21:31 pm 
Started by AJ_Kats - Last post by lurkingfear
I usually only schedule such a meeting when I have a specific proposal idea and want feedback. If that is the case for you, it doesn't hurt to make a few slides (emphasis on few, not more than 10 minutes worth) to show on a laptop to get the ball rolling. They may read a one pager you send in advance, or they may not, or they may read it and forget all the details. Your goal is to get beyond the program description available online and get a sense as to whether your idea is something that is potentially fundable. Some will help in this way, others are more cagey. One of the more valuable meetings I had ended with a follow up email from the program manager basically saying they don't recommend sending the project we talked about to them, and it would be better suited to some other program. This saved us a great deal of time, in spite of being a little disappointing.

 30 
 on: Yesterday at 10:18:56 pm 
Started by archman - Last post by goaswerfraiejen
They already did in 2012.

Argh. Well, puke then.

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