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Author Topic: So... what have you REREAD lately?  (Read 16082 times)
proftowanda
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"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #75 on: August 07, 2016, 3:44:31 pm »

I'm rereading the last-to-date Inspector Gamache mystery, The Nature of the Beast, in anticipation of the next in Louise Penny's series, to be released in a few weeks (as usual, that will be almost on my birthday, so my spouse already pre-ordered the ebook for me . . . uh, us).  I had forgotten that it was the one based on the truth-is-stranger-than-fiction account of the Supergun created in the physics labs of McGill University, so the pleasure of rereading is prolonged by frequent pauses for computer searches for more information on that -- as well as maps and more about the Eastern Townships region of Quebec. 

And each search tends to take me to more links and yet more links that transport me again to the mythical town of Three Pines -- and truth-is-stranger-than-fiction accounts of the Loyalist refugees from the American Revolution as well as of my French Canadian foremothers . . . and, of course, crepes and poutine and more, all inspiring me to plan a return trip.   



I love the series as well, and reserved the coming  A Great Reckoning eight months ago at my local library.  The only part of your comments I take issue with is poutine, which your forebears would not have recognized--it was invented quite recently, and though served in Quebec,  probably originated in the north of England.  Given the actual excellence of  Quebecois gravy and frites as separate dishes, I suspect your great grandmothers would have sneered at it.

Correct, of course.  Desole! re my sentence construction -- intended to mean that my search took me to links not only on past events but also on contemporary cuisine, the latter also inspiring a return trip.   (By the way, a recent trip to Paris, where I searched in vain for the sort of crepes so popular in Montreal, also led me to culinary research that suggests that my Parisian ancestors also would not have been familiar with the Quebecois version, which is from the Breton region of France.)
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catherder
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« Reply #76 on: August 07, 2016, 4:02:15 pm »

Ah! You've reminded me of my favourite Ottawa restaurant (now sadly demolished)  La Crepe Bretagne. Note the spelling--typical Ottawa French. In Montreal it would be 'Crepe Bretonne'.
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proftowanda
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"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #77 on: August 07, 2016, 4:15:21 pm »

Ah! You've reminded me of my favourite Ottawa restaurant (now sadly demolished)  La Crepe Bretagne. Note the spelling--typical Ottawa French. In Montreal it would be 'Crepe Bretonne'.

Yes, I also mourn the passing of the marvelous Le Crepe Bretonne, near McGill, famed for almost a hundred varieties of crepes on its menu (and for its interior design resembling the interior of a ship), many suitably priced for a college-student clientele.

That was my introduction to crepes, almost half a century ago.  So, in my planning for a recent return, I also was desole to discover that it had met its demise, with that of the owner (who apparently pioneered the Breton version in Montreal half a century ago; see https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1946&dat=19750418&id=8pAjAAAAIBAJ&sjid=yqEFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2369,685896).   

And I am not alone in mourning, as my search led to a link with many posts by others who share fond memories of that restaurant.  However, I am happy to report that wonderful crepes still can be found throughout Montreal, mmmm.
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"Face it, girls.  I'm older, and I have more insurance."     -- Towanda!
catherder
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« Reply #78 on: August 07, 2016, 5:11:42 pm »

And of course, unlike in France, we eat the crepes with maple syrup--or at least they used to offer it at creperies in both Ottawa and Montreal.
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catherder
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« Reply #79 on: September 07, 2016, 5:26:49 pm »

I'm rereading the last-to-date Inspector Gamache mystery, The Nature of the Beast, in anticipation of the next in Louise Penny's series, to be released in a few weeks (as usual, that will be almost on my birthday, so my spouse already pre-ordered the ebook for me . . . uh, us).  I had forgotten that it was the one based on the truth-is-stranger-than-fiction account of the Supergun created in the physics labs of McGill University, so the pleasure of rereading is prolonged by frequent pauses for computer searches for more information on that -- as well as maps and more about the Eastern Townships region of Quebec. 

And each search tends to take me to more links and yet more links that transport me again to the mythical town of Three Pines -- and truth-is-stranger-than-fiction accounts of the Loyalist refugees from the American Revolution as well as of my French Canadian foremothers . . . and, of course, crepes and poutine and more, all inspiring me to plan a return trip.   



I just finished her latest, "The Great Reckoning". Very intense and satisfying.
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ergative
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« Reply #80 on: September 07, 2016, 6:05:24 pm »

Rumpole of the Bailey. I've just finished the first Rumpole omnibus and am getting started on the second. He's such a joy.
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oldliberalarts
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« Reply #81 on: September 12, 2016, 7:45:13 pm »

Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny - an award wining sci-fi book that postulates a future world interaction of science and Hinduism as a measure of social control. 
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conjugate
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« Reply #82 on: September 20, 2016, 10:57:14 am »

Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny - an award wining sci-fi book that postulates a future world interaction of science and Hinduism as a measure of social control. 

I really liked that book.  But I loved a lot of Zelazny's stuff.
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mamselle
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« Reply #83 on: September 25, 2016, 2:34:12 pm »

Ditto to a few re-reads of Rumpole when in the library and putting off the work I came to do.

Also, Dick Francis' "The Edge," and started back through it for a third time just to read myself to sleep one night last week.

If BBC films count, I've nearly re-seen all of Morse and started over on Lewis, too.

M.
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Keilantra
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« Reply #84 on: September 26, 2016, 4:13:35 pm »

Reading The Slow Regard of Silent Things for a second time. Patrick Rothfuss is one of my favorite fantasy authors. Next on my rereading list is Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman.
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bibliothecula
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like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #85 on: September 27, 2016, 7:57:07 pm »

I just reread The Eyre Affair. Not entirely sure I liked it as much as I did the first time.
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ergative
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« Reply #86 on: September 28, 2016, 8:26:25 am »

I just reread The Eyre Affair. Not entirely sure I liked it as much as I did the first time.

I felt that way about all those books--not quite sure I liked them as much as I liked them.  The world-building and plot conceits were so clever, but the writing was somehow smug and annoying in a way that I can't pin down.
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vkw10
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« Reply #87 on: September 28, 2016, 9:47:21 pm »

Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold. This time, I found myself focusing on the divine who hijacked Ista's journey, noticing how he grew from not-quite-smug certainty that he could guide Ista's spiritual growth to recognition that Ista's spiritual life was much more complicated than he imagined.  I also enjoyed Ista's speculations that he planned the journey around inns with good food.
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melba_frilkins
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« Reply #88 on: Yesterday at 03:56:27 pm »

Trying to reread Ruth Rendell's No Night is Too Long

When I originally read it, it was intriguing but a bit confusing until the BIG REVEAL at the end. It was the sort of thing that changes how you'd be interpreting the entire story from the beginning. So, I though that several years later it'd be a fun re-read, a totally different story. It is totally different, but turning out to be a complete bore, because knowing the explanation for everything, the tension that made it interesting the first time around is gone. Not sure if I'll finish the reread or not.

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