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Author Topic: Favorite Female Authors and Their Work  (Read 44957 times)
octoprof
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« Reply #210 on: January 18, 2017, 9:10:16 am »

How, how did I not read her before??

This is exactly how I feel about Octavia Butler.

Almost nobody read Butler, for a long time.  And she didn't live long enough to win the prizes she should have.

I never heard of her until 2015 when I started reading women authors deliberately and went looking for sci-fi by women. She was bloody brilliant.

Kindred, for example, was published when I was in 8th or 9th grade. Someone should have suggested that to me in high school, surely?

Dawn was published while I was in the doctoral program and largely paying no attention to pleasure reading. But it took me 30 years to notice this book. Seriously?
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #211 on: January 18, 2017, 10:07:21 am »

How, how did I not read her before??

This is exactly how I feel about Octavia Butler.

Almost nobody read Butler, for a long time.  And she didn't live long enough to win the prizes she should have.

I never heard of her until 2015 when I started reading women authors deliberately and went looking for sci-fi by women. She was bloody brilliant.

Kindred, for example, was published when I was in 8th or 9th grade. Someone should have suggested that to me in high school, surely?

Dawn was published while I was in the doctoral program and largely paying no attention to pleasure reading. But it took me 30 years to notice this book. Seriously?

I heard about Butler as an English major in the late 80s-early 90s but didn't read Kindred until I was in my 30s. As for high school, sadly, I can't imagine that any of my teachers would have been talking about, or perhaps even aware of, contemporary black female authors.

In my experience, students today haven't heard of her either.
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brixton
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« Reply #212 on: January 18, 2017, 3:09:30 pm »

I loved Diane Setterfield's 13th  Tale.   Her newer book, Bellman and Black, didn't get the reviews that 13th Tale got.
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melba_frilkins
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« Reply #213 on: January 18, 2017, 5:40:26 pm »

If you love Ruth Rendell, then you will love ______

Please fill in the blank for me. I am getting to the end of her now (sadly) finite work.

I'd go back and start from the beginning, but they are mysteries and just don't work as re-reads.
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onthefringe
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« Reply #214 on: January 18, 2017, 5:59:33 pm »

The literature map has some interesting suggestions. Of those that look close there, I woul definitely suggest PD James, Minette Walters, Tana Fench, and  Martha Grimes .

Going a little further afield, Louise Penny and Charles Todd come to mind.

edited to add: Charles Todd is a mother and son writing team, so still at least sort of qualifies for the thread.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2017, 6:01:11 pm by onthefringe » Logged
itried
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« Reply #215 on: January 18, 2017, 6:13:14 pm »

My favorite female author by far is Marilynne Robinson... her writing is so evocative, gorgeous, and deep. I've re-read each of her books at least twice, and have read my favorite, Gilead, three times.

I also love Elizabeth Strout's recent work, particularly Olive Kitteridge and My Name is Lucy Barton, both if which I've read twice. Both books are wise and beautiful, because they capture the ambiguities of love so deliciously.

Others I love and tend to re-read are Kathleen Norris (Dakota), Robin Kimmerer (Gathering Moss), and Terry Tempest Williams (especially Refuge). I love and have read, and re-read, all of Barbara Kingsolver's fiction, but I'm not as drawn to her essays.

Recently I've begun to appreciate Rebecca Solnit more. I loved her recent book, Men Explain Things to Me, and have begun to explore other books of her "anti-memoir" essays. I like her emphasis on multiple and non-linear narratives for one's life.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2017, 6:16:48 pm by itried » Logged
melba_frilkins
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« Reply #216 on: January 18, 2017, 8:24:55 pm »

The literature map has some interesting suggestions. Of those that look close there, I woul definitely suggest PD James, Minette Walters, Tana Fench, and  Martha Grimes .

Going a little further afield, Louise Penny and Charles Todd come to mind.

edited to add: Charles Todd is a mother and son writing team, so still at least sort of qualifies for the thread.

Oh my gosh, I love that literature map!

It must be accurate since I've already read all of PD James. And one Minette Walters, Fox Evil, which I did enjoy. I sort of lost interest in Walters after a dismal attempt with an e-book (coming to realize that I hate e-books; it's just me). I should try her again, and then the others as well. Thanks so much.
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #217 on: January 19, 2017, 11:32:16 am »

My favorite female author by far is Marilynne Robinson... her writing is so evocative, gorgeous, and deep. I've re-read each of her books at least twice, and have read my favorite, Gilead, three times.

Oh, how I love Robinson. I've been meaning to reread Home and Lila. (I've read the others twice and suspect I'll return to Gilead every few years).

I was reminded of her when I read (and marveled over) Weathering by Lucy Wood a few weeks ago.
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catherder
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« Reply #218 on: January 19, 2017, 12:48:04 pm »

The literature map has some interesting suggestions. Of those that look close there, I woul definitely suggest PD James, Minette Walters, Tana Fench, and  Martha Grimes .

Going a little further afield, Louise Penny and Charles Todd come to mind.

edited to add: Charles Todd is a mother and son writing team, so still at least sort of qualifies for the thread.

Oh my gosh, I love that literature map!

It must be accurate since I've already read all of PD James. And one Minette Walters, Fox Evil, which I did enjoy. I sort of lost interest in Walters after a dismal attempt with an e-book (coming to realize that I hate e-books; it's just me). I should try her again, and then the others as well. Thanks so much.

If you like the combination of mystery and history in novels that have a contemporary setting, you might try Lyn Hamilton's series about a Toronto antiques dealer whose buying trips around the world keep landing her with corpses and conundrums. They are well-written and researched.

https://www.fantasticfiction.com/h/lyn-hamilton/

 
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pedanterast
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« Reply #219 on: January 20, 2017, 10:49:01 pm »

PD James is the best female mystery author of all time and would be the best of all time, period, if it weren't for the little matter of Ian Rankin.

But I read two more Rizzolis by Tess Gerritsen this week, and she is really good, too.  Now if Cornwell would get rid of Scarpetta's annoying Feebie husband, that would help close the gap between those two.
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