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Author Topic: that half-timer  (Read 13026 times)
fiona
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« Reply #30 on: April 23, 2012, 10:19:04 pm »

We should get a good GCF soon.

The Fiona
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The Fiona or Them FionŠ or Fiona the Sublime

Professor of Thread Killing, Fiork University
cc_alan
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Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #31 on: April 23, 2012, 10:58:08 pm »

OK, fine - I didn't mean to offend anyone. So pull up your chairs over there and exclude other well-meaning contributors. It's quite alright.
But has it never occurred to you how it feels for the (adult) students in your class who are being locked in (figuratively speaking). So what do you do if one of your "good ones" gets a caughing fit or acute case of severe hickups - not allowed to re-enter then, huh? No, but seriously now, I thought there were plenty of others who posted earlier and also had good points about how an effective instructor can manage a class room without having to resort to locking doors. I think it is worthwhile contemplating those suggestions. ...just sayin'

C'mon. Students are not "figuratively" locked-in. You can disagree with the policy (I don't agree with it) but that's a pretty silly scenario you've suggested. Someone who needs to leave the room for <insert important reason here> will be allowed back in.

I did lock the room one time after I got annoyed about students taking too long to return from a break (long classes, students were told the length of the break, some decided to repeatedly ignore the time) so I locked the door. After a few knocks that I ignored, a note was slipped under the door apologizing and asking for permission to enter.

Additionally, I find your "just sayin'" comment to be interesting. Possibly meaningless. Possibly not.

Alan
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Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
tinyzombie
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2012, 11:08:11 pm »

Interesting that someone who writes in such a customer-centric way -- "I DEMAND this because I am RIGHT" -- would consider attending a class to be "being locked in (figuratively speaking)." Aren't you paying for it? Stop paying, unlock the door, and let yourself out if you don't want to learn.

I would also like to know what a hickup looks/sounds like.
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frogfactory
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« Reply #33 on: April 23, 2012, 11:38:21 pm »

I know the average American college kid is quite young and they often seem to be immature,

Not any younger than college kids anywhere else.  They might act younger than students in other countries, but that's a whole other can of worms.

I do agree that treating them like the adults they are is the general way to go, as long as it's done consistently across the board.  But I also don't see what's wrong with a "no late entry" policy, whether it's done by locking the doors or by throwing anyone who walks in late right back out.  I can easily see such a policy being implemented in "grown up" professional circumstances like board meetings, and I don't think it's infantilising.  As long as the rule is made clear in advance, students should figure out how to live with it.  They don't run the class.
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fiona
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« Reply #34 on: April 24, 2012, 1:55:25 am »

...hm, interesting topic.
But please, let me ask - is it not horribly condescending to "lock" the door to the classroom - especially for the ones on the inside?! I know the average American college kid is quite young and they often seem to be immature, but is it not much better to actually treat them as adults. They will catch up on the concepts fast. This should be particularly easy in small classes - you know who is walking out early and can send them an email to call them for a meeting.
Frankly, if a professor or lecturer had EVER locked the classroom door while I was sitting in class (undergrad or grad class doesn't matter at what stage in my student days), I would have felt terribly insulted and in turn would have stood up and demanded to be LET OUT immediately - followed by a quick walk to the deans office to file a complaint. I would never accept to be locked in, and sorry by the way, but the argument that the door can be opened from the inside wouldn't cut it. It's the professors gesture that counts.

It's clear that the purpose of Polly's policy (ooh, alliteration!) is to keep students out, not in. It's hardly her fault if you can't understand how doors work.

I love this last line.

The Fiona
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The Fiona or Them FionŠ or Fiona the Sublime

Professor of Thread Killing, Fiork University
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« Reply #35 on: April 24, 2012, 9:23:47 am »

I need to figure out a more effective  enter late/leave early policy. My school is mostly all highway commuters and local area traffic and college parking are both complete PITA. I *always* have people coming in late, and it's sometimes as likely to be A students as slacker F students. Interstate highway snarls are notoriously bad. Our doors do not lock, so I can't play that game. Maybe I'll just add more extra credit quizzes at the beginning of class....

The early leaving students... hmmm... I like the natural breaks idea, especially since I have many people that leave 15 minutes early. It's like they are hardwired to believe college classes stop at 60 minutes. The early leavers tend to be D/F students, so *that* group is self-selecting for failure. It is the disruption to the other students that is annoying. Hmm... natural break at 60 minutes.

"All you weenies who can't handle 15 more minutes of class can get out now." Perhaps I should work on the wording... haha.
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ptarmigan
grad student & chief dork dumpling
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« Reply #36 on: April 24, 2012, 7:18:36 pm »

I'm confused about the reading comprehension issue.  No one is permanently locked out of my classes for any reason.  Just like the theatre does not allow people to interrupt the performance until a natural break occurs, I do not allow students to be a distraction from the main lecture.  When the natural break occurs, then the door is opened and people are admitted.

If you don't like that, then you are siding with the distraction, not the paying customers' right to a full educational experience.  Coughers should go in the hall and they will come back in a few minutes.

Oh, and FYI, the door is locked for perhaps as much as 15 minutes during a two-hour class.  For the rest of the time, people are free to do what they like as long as they are not actively denigrating the class.  I have never had a student pitch a fit like you are on this thread, Cirronimbus.

It would sort of be fun to see.

CN: <walks to front of room> I demand that you let me out right now!
PM: Sure, no problem, go on out.
Other students: What's up with that guy?

It would be even more entertaining if he did it every time.
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He's on my roster, but if I've taught him anything, it isn't math.
llanfair
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Whither Canada?


« Reply #37 on: April 24, 2012, 7:36:58 pm »

I'm confused about the reading comprehension issue.  No one is permanently locked out of my classes for any reason.  Just like the theatre does not allow people to interrupt the performance until a natural break occurs, I do not allow students to be a distraction from the main lecture.  When the natural break occurs, then the door is opened and people are admitted.

If you don't like that, then you are siding with the distraction, not the paying customers' right to a full educational experience.  Coughers should go in the hall and they will come back in a few minutes.

Oh, and FYI, the door is locked for perhaps as much as 15 minutes during a two-hour class.  For the rest of the time, people are free to do what they like as long as they are not actively denigrating the class.  I have never had a student pitch a fit like you are on this thread, Cirronimbus.

It would sort of be fun to see.

CN: <walks to front of room> I demand that you let me out right now!
PM: Sure, no problem, go on out.
Other students: What's up with that guy?

It would be even more entertaining if he did it every time.

<looking around for Cirronimbus>

Who let him out, anyway?
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Stop looking for zebras when the horse is already standing on your foot.
proftowanda
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"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #38 on: April 25, 2012, 11:00:22 pm »

OK, fine - I didn't mean to offend anyone. So pull up your chairs over there and exclude other well-meaning contributors. It's quite alright.
But has it never occurred to you how it feels for the (adult) students in your class who are being locked in (figuratively speaking). So what do you do if one of your "good ones" gets a caughing fit or acute case of severe hickups - not allowed to re-enter then, huh? No, but seriously now, I thought there were plenty of others who posted earlier and also had good points about how an effective instructor can manage a class room without having to resort to locking doors. I think it is worthwhile contemplating those suggestions. ...just sayin'

If you did not mean to be offensive, fine -- but here's a hint for the future:  the "I'm sorry, but" construction always, always communicates that the writer (or speaker) is about to be offensive. 

And, of course, that the writer (or speaker) isn't sorry, not at all.

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cc_alan
is a wossname
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Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #39 on: April 25, 2012, 11:18:05 pm »

I'm confused about the reading comprehension issue.  No one is permanently locked out of my classes for any reason.  Just like the theatre does not allow people to interrupt the performance until a natural break occurs, I do not allow students to be a distraction from the main lecture.  When the natural break occurs, then the door is opened and people are admitted.

If you don't like that, then you are siding with the distraction, not the paying customers' right to a full educational experience.  Coughers should go in the hall and they will come back in a few minutes.

Oh, and FYI, the door is locked for perhaps as much as 15 minutes during a two-hour class.  For the rest of the time, people are free to do what they like as long as they are not actively denigrating the class.  I have never had a student pitch a fit like you are on this thread, Cirronimbus.

It would sort of be fun to see.

CN: <walks to front of room> I demand that you let me out right now!
PM: Sure, no problem, go on out.
Other students: What's up with that guy?

It would be even more entertaining if he did it every time.

<looking around for Cirronimbus>

Who let him out, anyway?

I think he stepped out to take a phone call. The door's still locked so he can't get back in, however.

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan
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Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
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When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #40 on: April 25, 2012, 11:24:43 pm »

My department head and I teach different sections of the same course, with enrollements each approaching about 30 students.  She told me today that, at this point, only about four students show up for her class.  It's a required class that the students hate--they don't know why they have to take it--but I was still shocked, as I have almost 100 percent attendance every session, except for the past week or so.  (We're at the very end of the semester now, plus we're on the hardest unit in the course.)  I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)
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People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y ense˝en bien a sus hijos.
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
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Posts: 16,749

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #41 on: April 26, 2012, 9:20:35 am »

I'm confused about the reading comprehension issue.  No one is permanently locked out of my classes for any reason.  Just like the theatre does not allow people to interrupt the performance until a natural break occurs, I do not allow students to be a distraction from the main lecture.  When the natural break occurs, then the door is opened and people are admitted.

If you don't like that, then you are siding with the distraction, not the paying customers' right to a full educational experience.  Coughers should go in the hall and they will come back in a few minutes.

Oh, and FYI, the door is locked for perhaps as much as 15 minutes during a two-hour class.  For the rest of the time, people are free to do what they like as long as they are not actively denigrating the class.  I have never had a student pitch a fit like you are on this thread, Cirronimbus.

It would sort of be fun to see.

CN: <walks to front of room> I demand that you let me out right now!
PM: Sure, no problem, go on out.
Other students: What's up with that guy?

It would be even more entertaining if he did it every time.

<looking around for Cirronimbus>

Who let him out, anyway?

I think he stepped out to take a phone call. The door's still locked so he can't get back in, however.

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan

A strong wind came, and he floated away.
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
llanfair
Still reading past her bedtime and Very
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 32,662

Whither Canada?


« Reply #42 on: April 26, 2012, 9:49:00 am »

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan

Alan really IS a man among men.

<bats eyelashes>
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Stop looking for zebras when the horse is already standing on your foot.
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
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When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #43 on: April 26, 2012, 9:53:02 am »

I'm not sure what I'd do if only four people showed up every class period.  (I hope I don't have to find out what I'd do!)

If the same four people show up all the time, then I just adjust my thinking and planning for those four people.  We have a nice small class and get to have great discussions.

If a different four people show up, then I pretend that I don't care and continue on.  Depending on the class, I will either just do standalone activities so that everyone learns something or lecture as though everyone were attending all the time since a logical assumption is students are keeping up with the reading and only attending the lectures where they want clarification.

Well, yes.  I just have trouble imagining a lab-based course in which two dozen people regularly don't show up.
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People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y ense˝en bien a sus hijos.
cc_alan
is a wossname
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Posts: 10,375

Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #44 on: April 26, 2012, 10:17:13 am »

There were still more than 5 minutes left in class today when some people starting packing up. It's like dogs barking- one starts packing and then more join in.

"NO PREFLIGHT. We still have time left in class and since I'm not done, that means you aren't done. STOP IT."

Alan

Alan really IS a man among men.

<bats eyelashes>

:)

It didn't help that there were some other "issues" with the class that day. I don't think students realize how disrupting it is when they preflight. I know I didn't...

$%#! Did I just admit to doing that as a student? Oops.

A strong wind came, and he floated away.

Sorry! I'm having intestinal issues today. I'll try and be more discrete.

Alan
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Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
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