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Author Topic: outside consultant visit?  (Read 2462 times)
meritocracy
Junior member
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Posts: 84


« on: December 02, 2012, 5:28:42 pm »

Why would a college within a university invite consultants to visit who interviewed the faculty in two large groups over two days with absolutely no specified agenda?
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systeme_d_
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 17,362

No T, no shade. Usually.


« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2012, 6:56:38 pm »

It depends.
What kind of questions did the consultants ask?

I think you can probably assume that there are some major changes being planned by the administration.
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meritocracy
Junior member
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Posts: 84


« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2012, 7:04:41 pm »

The consultant said that 'all they knew' was that this is NOT a routine / normal program review, which they have both done before. The meeting I went to (I hope the other one was better, but I heard it was the same, alas), had one of the consultants (the one who had arrived, he had not yet met with the other consultant who was arriving later) asking what the faculty were excited about and trying to be a positive 'booster' of the college division within the univ. discussion was unfocused and unproductive, but we were being told we should be excited about our college. There was literally no point. I know there's a hidden angle to it, but since no one knows what that is... Would someone put money into outside consultants for literally no reason? I think not...
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seniorscholar
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Posts: 7,821


« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2012, 8:23:38 pm »

And from what you've said, it sounds as if there may be some changes to the college structure being contemplated -- moving some programs from one college to another (at my place, Computer Science bounced around from Arts & Sciences to Engineering to Business between 1980 and 1995, though it's still physically where it has always been, in the building where the mainframes live), or combining a couple of colleges with each other while eliminating a few departments, or creating some inter-college "Centers" which will, in theory, attract a lot of attention and corporate funding . . .

Many of these plans die quietly before creating a mess and spending a great deal of $$$$ on new letterhead, new quarters, new administrators and new assistants to the assistant dean/director, and expensive PR.
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yellowtractor
Vice-Provost of the University of the South-East Corner of Donkeyshire (formerly Donkeyshire Polytechnic) (a Post-1992 University) and also a
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 21,284


« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2012, 9:04:04 pm »

SeniorScholar is reasonable and wise, as always.

If this line of thinking doesn't produce any useful results, conduct a quick headcount to make sure everyone's still there.
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It is, of course, possible that what I remember as terror was only a love too great to bear.
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