• August 29, 2016

Chronicle Forums

August 29, 2016, 8:43:29 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please Log In to participate in forums.
News: Talk about how to cope with chronic illness, disability, and other health issues in the academic workplace.
 
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 07:16:32 am 
Started by rowan1 - Last post by egilson
I don't know if this is actually Bang worthy, but...

I'm giving an exam today and I'm greeted at the door of the classroom by two students who tell me that  they just don't have it today and will not be able to give their best performance, so they would like to schedule a makeup exam.   On the one hand I appreciate the honesty rather than getting a doctor's note off the internet, but it's not exactly fair to everyone else.

I think that if you neither laughed nor stared at them and flatly said, "Bullsh!t," you showed admirable restraint.

 2 
 on: Today at 06:39:26 am 
Started by prytania3 - Last post by octoprof

Good morning!

Up since three am. Ugh.

Back to the doc today.

Next week
  • Monday
    • Doctor appointment out of town
    • Office hours 3pm (email students about that?)
  • Tuesday
    • 8am, speak to W's class
    • Office hours, 12-2
    • Meeting 2:30-3:30
  • Wednesday
    • Office hours 10-12
    • Training 1-3pm (online)
    • Meet with discipline faculty?
  • Thursday
    • Orthodoc (What time?)
    • Office hours 3-5pm
  • Friday
    • Writing group? Ask E and J about this?
  • Saturday
    • Sort the camping equipment
  • Other
    • Knit a few rows
    • Call Mama; Call Sue
    • Copy editing
    • Table for Mr. W's tools?

 3 
 on: Today at 06:35:51 am 
Started by iodide - Last post by mamselle
Just from my own experience, the most outstanding advisors in my memory were those who knew course requirements, teachers, career resources in the community, and job-related intern options cold.

One had them all memorized, one kept files of brochures for browsing and had a whole table area set up with extra computers for follow-up.

The former must have visited/sat in on a bazillion classes because they had an unerring sense for whose teaching approaches were rigorous and interesting, and who was laid-back. They were also both good listeners, really took in my odd, quirky goals and saw the point of the work I was only just beginning to see for myself.

I'd say the quality of intentional listening was most important, followed by the imagination to become a midwife to someone's yet-unformed dreams, and lots of product knowledge.

Those may not be accreditable, as such...they're not always going to show up on a CV as quantifiable, but they'd sure give you street cred.

M.

 4 
 on: Today at 06:23:16 am 
Started by rowan1 - Last post by mamselle
I don't know if this is actually Bang worthy, but...

I'm giving an exam today and I'm greeted at the door of the classroom by two students who tell me that  they just don't have it today and will not be able to give their best performance, so they would like to schedule a makeup exam.   On the one hand I appreciate the honesty rather than getting a doctor's note off the internet, but it's not exactly fair to everyone else.

Good grief!

Just...no!

M.

 5 
 on: Today at 06:16:35 am 
Started by scraffle - Last post by mamselle
Youse guys are lucky, just sayin'

I presented on both my minor topic (once) and my major topic (twice, same paper: once regional, once interational) as I was rounding the bend with thesis writing, and my department secretary had never before processed the support paperwork and didn't know how....took forever to be reimbursed.

 And then she didn't believe that registration fees and food and housing should be covered, or that grad students' expenses were to be fully reimbursed, so she returned half the travel, only.

This was clearly in the days before grad presentations in the humanities were an expected thing....it was like being punished for trying a bit harder.

Just to provide some historic context....

;--}

Good luck!
M.

 6 
 on: Today at 06:00:32 am 
Started by mamselle - Last post by mamselle
Bumping...we are looking at Dec 7-9 at Legal Seafood in the Prudential Center for a CHE meet-up!

What day-date-time is best, and is anyone up for a strolling tour of Back Bay churches & libraries, either then or around then? (Can't always get in, but two have Tiffany glass, two others are by H.H.Richardson, two are heir congregations to colonial gatherings from 1629/30- 1669, and several have housed significant figures and/or founders of Unitarianism, Anglo-Catholicism, etc. They also serve as monadnockial stylistic markers for the decades of architectural change as the Back Bay was being filled in and built up from 1852-1920.) No efforts at conversion are ever made, just good visual readings of significant structures on offer, and only if there is interest and weather allows!

Looking forward to meeting up!

M.


 7 
 on: Today at 05:44:56 am 
Started by expatinuk - Last post by mamselle
My joking, standard reply to the oft-mandated service request, "Anything else I can get you?" is, with straight face, "A free trip to France." Those who are quickest on the uptake say, "If you go, I'm going, too," or something similar....

In fact, on the next-last trip I took there, I nearly did have a free trip on FF miles....it cost USD 65.00, I think, to buy the few hundred extra miles needed and cover the tax, but it was as good as free.

So, yes, it is possible!

M.

 8 
 on: Today at 01:27:37 am 
Started by expatinuk - Last post by expatinuk
Imagine my surprise that by buying 2 one way tickets with miles saved me a bunch of miles... and I got biz class.

 9 
 on: Today at 12:58:38 am 
Started by voxprincipalis - Last post by kiana
I realize that you're a family friend and you've helped out my brother, but do. not. freaking start sending me racist political messages.

 10 
 on: Today at 12:27:15 am 
Started by iodide - Last post by iodide
Hello all,

I am about six months into my first position as an academic advisor. I'm in a small department where my advising colleagues and my supervisor see advising as a stepping stone to other areas of higher education, but I plan to stay in advising for at least a few years. My short-term plan is to continue as an advisor for another year or possibly two at this institution and then look for an advising position at another college, such as my alma mater, where the pay is significantly higher and my commute would be much shorter. Unfortunately I can't move closer to the institution where I work.

My question is: what are the most important things I should be doing to a) develop as an advisor, and b) prepare to be a strong candidate when I go back onto the job market? I really like working here, but I don't think I can handle the long commute indefinitely. Since academic advising is a very competitive area of higher education, I'm afraid I won't be able to get another advising position unless I somehow distinguish myself. I could look for a position in an area that has higher turnover, like admissions, but if possible I would like to stay in advising.

I've joined NACADA and hope to attend the next conference, but I'm not sure what else I should be doing. I would ask my supervisor for advice, but she has a different career path in mind and does not attend conferences, publish articles, keep up to date with advising theories, etc.

I would really appreciate any input. Thanks!

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.