Bang Your Head on Your Desk - the thread of teaching despair!

<< < (1653/2822) > >>

sciencegrad:
Quote from: tigerseye on April 18, 2013,  8:47:50 am

Some of this is that they don't know how to take notes fast, they've never developed their own shorthand/abbreviations.  

It's also true that at the end of the term we're probably not giving them enough time to copy what is on the board before we start yammering.   That's why I drink coffee while I teach. Sipping slows me down.


The timing is a problem for me as a student. I can either write or I can listen to what is being said, but I have a hard time doing both simultaneously. I'm always torn between writing everything down or writing nothing down and pay attention to what is being said under the assumption that everything that is written on the board is in the book.

lizardmom1:


The timing is a problem for me as a student. I can either write or I can listen to what is being said, but I have a hard time doing both simultaneously. I'm always torn between writing everything down or writing nothing down and pay attention to what is being said under the assumption that everything that is written on the board is in the book.
[/quote]

I am not sure it is a good idea to assume everything that is written on the board is in the book. In my class, that is most definitely NOT the case. I would not waste valuable class time writing down something that is readily accessible to students in another format. What I write down on the board is almost always unavailable in other sources (such as the textbook, on Blackboard Learn, or in students' supplementary materials).

marigolds:
Quote from: lizardmom1 on April 17, 2013, 11:24:50 pm

Quote from: marigolds on April 17, 2013,  6:22:05 pm

Banning all tech sounds precisely like a power struggle in the making; I think you'd be setting yourself up to lose, because (as you say) you simply can't police the entire hall.  (Like parenting: if you can't reasonably follow through on a threat, then don't make the threat, right?)

I often make students read something about how people learn, or even do a short lecture on it very early in the semester--if they *know* that not processing (by synthesizing information and writing notes) and making connections between new information and prior knowledge/schemas (application, analogies, models, etc.) makes them much more likely to forget/not understand it, then that choice to fart around or copy/paste or photograph rather than jot down becomes one that they're making in a fully informed way.  At that point, I just keep them from distracting other students.



Marigolds, please share your reference list concerning the above. I would be most grateful.


I often use a short bit from Why Students Don't Like School for them to read.  My lectures aren't cited (I'm in the humanities and treat this as a mini-how-to-succeed-in-college lesson!) so I don't have a reference list for you there.  I often point them to Cal Newport's blog for specific posts about specific skills, how to develop attention and focus, etc.  (It's a good level for first-years and he has some interesting things to say about student success.) 

bioteacher:
Quote from: barred_owl on April 18, 2013,  2:31:01 am

I swear, sometimes, I feel like the disembodied adult voice in the animated "Peanuts" cartoons, especially in A&P. The session goes something like this:

From my vantage point: 
Visual:  Powerpoint slide of a muscle and tendon connection, no text.
ME:  "Muscle fibers and the dense connective tissue of a tendon form a continuous connection to the periosteum of a bone.  Remember the periosteum is...(etc.)"

From the students' vantage point:
Visual:  Powerpoint slide...<student thought bubble>Surely there will be something we'll need to write down, right?</bubble><student hands remain immobile in anticipation of having to write something down>
ME:  "Waah, waah, wah-wah-wah..."

Two reasonable minutes  later:

ME (thinking to myself):  What?  Are you all catatonic or something?  Oh, wait!

<project same slide, but this time with TEXT>

Suddenly, students spring into action, pencils and pens furiously scribbling down whatever text is on the slide.

Maybe I'll try inserting some nonsense text into one of Friday's slides, and see what happens...


You've been spying on my classes, stalking me from classroom to classroom, changed intro biology to A&P so you wouldn't plagiarize me and are trying to pass off my experience as your own. I'm telling on you!

Moooooommmmm, Barred Owl is being a copy cat again. Make her stop!

<Flounces off in search of Mom>

nezahualcoyotl:
Quote from: biomancer on April 17, 2013,  1:27:33 pm

Senior theses that are required of all students, no matter how disengaged the students are, are a horrible terrible idea.


Welcome to my world.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page