• February 19, 2017

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February 19, 2017, 2:43:48 pm *
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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 02:43:39 pm 
Started by tjuh2168 - Last post by tjuh2168
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 2 
 on: Today at 02:43:14 pm 
Started by spork - Last post by aandsdean
I just googled "tuition free governor" and found plans in Tennessee and Rhode Island for free statewide community college enrollment. The reportage does not mention means testing so I assume the plans are not need-based.

What happens when a chunk of the 18-20 year olds who typically enroll in private four-year colleges out of high school can do their first two years for free at a community college? Finite capacity means not all of them will be able to enter, but I assume some will. The article on Cuomo's plan quotes people at Paul Smith's College, etc., as projecting a 10 percent enrollment drop if the plan is implemented. Accurate?

Probably. The privates in TN are struggling. There aren't that many in RI (I doubt it's a problem for Brown!) so it's not clear there.

[. . . ]

By adding schools in MA from Worcester eastward (excluding Boston, which I assume is its own market), there are a goodly number that don't have the brand of Brown, BC, or Holy Cross. I'm thinking places like Assumption, Wheaton, Curry, Stonehill, Roger Williams U. Could be some also in eastern CT. I assume some of these schools attract students from the lower half of the SES scale who would be content to do two years for free at a CC before transferring to a private for the bachelor's.

If that happens in significant numbers, you can say bye-bye to gen ed courses and faculty at these lower-ranked privates.

This is basically true, except that RI is a very small state and so the effects wouldn't be nearly as large as they would be if MA or CT or NY were to go this way.

 3 
 on: Today at 02:41:54 pm 
Started by historymistress88 - Last post by helpful
Can you use proper paragraphing so your story would be easier to read? Thanks.

 4 
 on: Today at 02:39:19 pm 
Started by figee - Last post by helpful
Q. Hey, our hero Mr. Drumpf is taking a balloon ride today! Let's go watch!

A. The conductor was made of metal, so the music was a bit scratchy.

 5 
 on: Today at 02:36:00 pm 
Started by tjuh2168 - Last post by tjuh2168
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 6 
 on: Today at 02:28:31 pm 
Started by tjuh2168 - Last post by tjuh2168
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 7 
 on: Today at 02:25:09 pm 
Started by historymistress88 - Last post by historymistress88
A year ago a new tenure-track Assistant Professor joined our faculty;  as a senior faculty member,I was very much in support, advocating for his hire during the job search--he was the best candidate and had fresh ideas and great energy.  His hire was partly to add to a growing program in our department, a program which I formerly co-directed with a colleague who retired a few years ago, at which time I became director of the program. For 13 years, the co-directorship was difficult, with a colleague who was a full-on bully, secretive, and resistant to change.  We also had an outside evaluator recommend that the program have one director.  Now the staff seems happy and freer to express their opinions, and they have expressed to me that they prefer one director.  For the last two years, it has been wonderful, and my new colleague is delightful to work with and full of ideas, but he needs more experience as it relates to the program and the discipline.  That said, he expressed a desire to be the director of this program.  He does not seem interested in the history of the program and is uninterested as to how we arrived to where we are now.  I did tell him that he would probably be the next director some day, but not now.   He took it well, but it seems to me that if he had been more strategic, instead of being pushy about this, that he would have been smart to wait for another year before broaching the subject.  I realize that he is trying to find his place and is also quietly competitive in a friendly way with another male faculty member in the department, and having this directorship would elevate him in the eyes of his peers.  On one hand, I find this somewhat amusing, but on the other, as a woman faculty who has worked very hard to get where I am, I also find this a bit annoying.  If anyone has experienced this sort of thing, I'd be curious to know what your reaction in this situation.   

 8 
 on: Today at 01:53:09 pm 
Started by spork - Last post by spork
I just googled "tuition free governor" and found plans in Tennessee and Rhode Island for free statewide community college enrollment. The reportage does not mention means testing so I assume the plans are not need-based.

What happens when a chunk of the 18-20 year olds who typically enroll in private four-year colleges out of high school can do their first two years for free at a community college? Finite capacity means not all of them will be able to enter, but I assume some will. The article on Cuomo's plan quotes people at Paul Smith's College, etc., as projecting a 10 percent enrollment drop if the plan is implemented. Accurate?

Probably. The privates in TN are struggling. There aren't that many in RI (I doubt it's a problem for Brown!) so it's not clear there.

[. . . ]

By adding schools in MA from Worcester eastward (excluding Boston, which I assume is its own market), there are a goodly number that don't have the brand of Brown, BC, or Holy Cross. I'm thinking places like Assumption, Wheaton, Curry, Stonehill, Roger Williams U. Could be some also in eastern CT. I assume some of these schools attract students from the lower half of the SES scale who would be content to do two years for free at a CC before transferring to a private for the bachelor's.

If that happens in significant numbers, you can say bye-bye to gen ed courses and faculty at these lower-ranked privates.

 9 
 on: Today at 01:30:05 pm 
Started by spork - Last post by protoplasm
But legislators can afford penicillin.

 10 
 on: Today at 01:21:03 pm 
Started by spork - Last post by Lloyd_and_Ron
These are the main issues why simply upping an across-the-board, need-based grant program is the way to go.

If the goal is to lower college costs to students while providing quality education with minimal economic dislocation, I think you're right that increasing grants across the board is the way to go.

But, if Cuomo's goal is to be able to say he provided free tuition for the lowest possible pricetag (longterm consequences be damned, because they'll be felt after the next election cycle), then increasing grants probably isn't the way to go.  It seems that the math they're working with is that the cost of the program = existing public seats x cost of tuition.  In the short run maybe that even works, but of course in the long run it won't as pressure to increase seats mounts.

The alternative seems to me to be for the SUNY and CUNY systems to absorb a bunch of private schools.  I believe this happened on a fairly large scale in Canada during the 20th century.  Having "SUNY Paul Smiths" seems like a fine enough solution to me.  The biggest barrier seems to me to be that Boards often take as part of their charge that the institutional mission be fulfilled only within the boundaries of maintaining independence, often at the  eventual expense of the larger teaching and research missions.  There are of course other issues: the state might not want to be saddled with deferred maintenance costs and/or relatively inefficient business models that will be hard to change; there may be influential admin who want to maintain their autonomy, or fear the loss of their jobs outright; tenured faculty could also be let go under such exigent circumstances.  While there are clearly lots of powerful forces working against mergers, I think they are a reasonable solution for much of what ails us.

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