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Author Topic: Why Parents Drink  (Read 1294633 times)
baleful_regards
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« Reply #3285 on: June 18, 2012, 3:16:55 pm »

Does he have some sensory issues? Many children with sensory integration issues will heavily resist food changes. They have a certain group of foods that they will eat and will not deviate from them.

BalefulTeen was a Sensory integration dysfunction kid - She ate what we termed the "beige" diet. It has resolved slowly, over time, but she also worked with an OT to integrate new textures into her diet.

Balefulteen would regularly freak OUT if something came out of a restaurant kitchen with anything green (parsley) on it. She also once vomited at the table when I insisted she try some broccoli. She liked crunchy but not smooth. No potatoes, no bananas. Oh, there was a whole list.

There were other facets to SI - she was what is termed "sensory seeking" -so she licked everything until about age 8. She would try to take the hottest showers imaginable and I would find her asleep with her foot on the heating element in her room. She hated tags and seams with a vengeance and her clothes had to be cotton with no elastic on the edges. She was and is very LOUD.

Other kids are sensory avoidant, which has its own set of challenges.

The "in" terminology seems to be Sensory Processing Disorder:

http://www.spdfoundation.net/about-sensory-processing-disorder.html
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fearless_winnower
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« Reply #3286 on: June 18, 2012, 3:30:45 pm »

Does he have some sensory issues? Many children with sensory integration issues will heavily resist food changes. They have a certain group of foods that they will eat and will not deviate from them.

BalefulTeen was a Sensory integration dysfunction kid - She ate what we termed the "beige" diet. It has resolved slowly, over time, but she also worked with an OT to integrate new textures into her diet.

Balefulteen would regularly freak OUT if something came out of a restaurant kitchen with anything green (parsley) on it. She also once vomited at the table when I insisted she try some broccoli. She liked crunchy but not smooth. No potatoes, no bananas. Oh, there was a whole list.

There were other facets to SI - she was what is termed "sensory seeking" -so she licked everything until about age 8. She would try to take the hottest showers imaginable and I would find her asleep with her foot on the heating element in her room. She hated tags and seams with a vengeance and her clothes had to be cotton with no elastic on the edges. She was and is very LOUD.

Other kids are sensory avoidant, which has its own set of challenges.

The "in" terminology seems to be Sensory Processing Disorder:

http://www.spdfoundation.net/about-sensory-processing-disorder.html

No, he doesn't have any of those symptoms.  I'm pretty sure he's just a normal picky toddler, and that he'll grow out of it eventually.  It's just frustrating in the meantime.
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baleful_regards
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« Reply #3287 on: June 18, 2012, 3:39:48 pm »

Does he have some sensory issues? Many children with sensory integration issues will heavily resist food changes. They have a certain group of foods that they will eat and will not deviate from them.

BalefulTeen was a Sensory integration dysfunction kid - She ate what we termed the "beige" diet. It has resolved slowly, over time, but she also worked with an OT to integrate new textures into her diet.

Balefulteen would regularly freak OUT if something came out of a restaurant kitchen with anything green (parsley) on it. She also once vomited at the table when I insisted she try some broccoli. She liked crunchy but not smooth. No potatoes, no bananas. Oh, there was a whole list.

There were other facets to SI - she was what is termed "sensory seeking" -so she licked everything until about age 8. She would try to take the hottest showers imaginable and I would find her asleep with her foot on the heating element in her room. She hated tags and seams with a vengeance and her clothes had to be cotton with no elastic on the edges. She was and is very LOUD.

Other kids are sensory avoidant, which has its own set of challenges.

The "in" terminology seems to be Sensory Processing Disorder:

http://www.spdfoundation.net/about-sensory-processing-disorder.html

No, he doesn't have any of those symptoms.  I'm pretty sure he's just a normal picky toddler, and that he'll grow out of it eventually.  It's just frustrating in the meantime.

Ah, then +1 to TF's post. Food jags are annoying but not deadly.  The less you get worked up, the faster it will resolve.
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tenured_feminist
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« Reply #3288 on: June 18, 2012, 4:49:25 pm »

There is hope. Last night, I served kale sauteed with butter, a whole lotta garlic, and a dash of teriyaki sauce. The kids (youngest age 8) ate all that they took from the pan, begged some more off of my plate and Mr. T_F's plate, and then fought over the remnants.

Well, actually it was pretty unpleasant because there were heated charges of unfairness in portion sizes, etc. But maybe this is encouraging in that the nature of mealtime battles will eventually change??
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baleful_regards
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« Reply #3289 on: June 18, 2012, 5:11:47 pm »

There is hope. Last night, I served kale sauteed with butter, a whole lotta garlic, and a dash of teriyaki sauce. The kids (youngest age 8) ate all that they took from the pan, begged some more off of my plate and Mr. T_F's plate, and then fought over the remnants.

Well, actually it was pretty unpleasant because there were heated charges of unfairness in portion sizes, etc. But maybe this is encouraging in that the nature of mealtime battles will eventually change??

Oh, they do. Even BalefulTeen - who had picky eating habits AND other sensory issues - now eats like a real human. She adores garlic scape pesto, will eat wilted kale from the BBQ and has "discovered" veggie sushi.

It is divine to watch as she digs into bibimbap and miso soup at the korean place we love.

I truly thought we had raised someone who would only eat chicken fingers and blueberries for the longest time.

It just takes time and continual exposure to "different" foods.

Balefulteen has a cousin who is a year younger and his issue is that he was never exposed to any foods that weren't a very specific set - not many fresh fruits and veggies etc. He'd never seen a real eggplant ( let alone eaten one) before he stayed with us last summer at 12 years of age. He had also never eaten a peach - as a whole fresh peach. I started taking him with me and pointing at different fruits and veggies to make sure he knew what they were and had eaten them. I cut up mangoes, papaya, different melons, pineapple, kohlrabi, jicama, asparagus, kale, chard...in an effort to get this child exposed to as much as humanly possible in the month he stayed with us.

Luckily he is an easy going kid and was willing to at least try everything. BalefulTeen took great delight and having him try things she will now eat ( and acts like she has ALWAYS eaten it) with "Oh! You've never had...dragon fruit before?"

There is some thought that the toddler "set" diet is an evolutionary left over...from days when eating the wrong thing could kill you. However the autonomy issues at work are just as probable.
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mystictechgal
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« Reply #3290 on: June 18, 2012, 6:16:04 pm »

Laughs. I have never had dragonfruit before. I bought one last week. It's still sitting on the counter. I was a very picky eater when I was a kid. Now, I'll eat just about anything. But, for some reason I haven't been able to make myself cut into that dragonfruit. Even though I want to.
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baleful_regards
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« Reply #3291 on: June 18, 2012, 6:33:02 pm »

Laughs. I have never had dragonfruit before. I bought one last week. It's still sitting on the counter. I was a very picky eater when I was a kid. Now, I'll eat just about anything. But, for some reason I haven't been able to make myself cut into that dragonfruit. Even though I want to.

It has a pretty mild taste, overall. It looks far more exciting that it tastes, I fear.
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madhatter
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« Reply #3292 on: June 19, 2012, 11:41:38 am »

Laughs. I have never had dragonfruit before. I bought one last week. It's still sitting on the counter. I was a very picky eater when I was a kid. Now, I'll eat just about anything. But, for some reason I haven't been able to make myself cut into that dragonfruit. Even though I want to.

It has a pretty mild taste, overall. It looks far more exciting that it tastes, I fear.

Yeah. On the other hand, persimmons, which look quite boring, can be amazingly sumptuous.
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #3293 on: June 19, 2012, 2:39:29 pm »

Background: Last year, an official with my kids' soccer league was a total jerk to me. Mr. A. still hasn't forgiven him (nor should he).

More background: Today was the first time I had to pick up my son from his soccer camp; Mr. A. has been doing most of the transportation. He called me when I was in the car on the way; Jo was in the backseat.

Mr. A:  Just want to remind you that The d*****bag will be at the park when you pick up the boy.
Me: Um, you're on speaker phone now. <etc., hang up>
Jo: What does Daddy mean? Why will there be a juicebag at the park?
Me: <deciding how to handle this and choosing evasion> I don't really know.
Jo: And why did you say that thing about the speaker phone? Why don't you want to talk about juicebags?
Me: Well . . .
Jo: I know! The juicebag is a surprise for my birthday! There's going to be a juicebag at the park for me! Why didn't you just tell me that?

Fortunately, by the time we got there, she'd forgotten all about the juicebag at the park. I'm in no mood to have that particular vocabulary lesson today . . .
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madhatter
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« Reply #3294 on: June 19, 2012, 3:26:17 pm »

Ha!

It's important to always remember that little ears haven't been to loud rock concerts like big ears, thus they hear everything.
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dr_backwoods
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« Reply #3295 on: June 19, 2012, 8:23:34 pm »

Yet another round of "I'm gonna tell": Tattling Behaviour in the Elementary-Aged Child. Seriously, I do not need to know every time your brother says "poop", Mr. Junior Policeman.

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mssnvrnchtngsmttl
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« Reply #3296 on: June 20, 2012, 2:19:54 am »

To grab something someone said up thread: your toddlers drink milk?

My son will eat olives, garlic pasta, every kind of fruit, peppers both raw and cooked, broccoli, peas, beef, lamb, chicken, salmon, cod, spicy rice and beans with sausage, every kind of cheese you ever heard of, yogurt, and pretty much everything you talk up to him (I once had to cede a plate of steamed mussels to him after offering him one on a fork saying, "how many times in life do you get to eat a whole dude?" After trying the one I offered, he started ripping the shells open with his hands and scooping them out with his teeth like a baby otter. We have not been back to that restaurant.) But he will. not. drink. milk. Not whole milk, not skim, not almond or soy milk. He used to nurse pretty often, but now asks to nurse at naptime as a euphemism for passing out snuggled against my bare breast (well, we only do that at home, and he won't exactly be asking me to come over and "nurse" him in college).

I recently changed pediatricians, and the guy was like "no milk huh?" Mssnvrnchtngstoddler is on the small side, and seems to have slowed his growth significantly in his second year of life, though so far everyone is of the opinion that he's just a skinny kid. I said, "no, no milk, but we eat lots of yogurt and cheese and stuff." The pediatrician said, "does he happen to consume a pint of yogurt per day?" I had to admit that he does not. But he doesn't like milk. I don't like milk either, not as a beverage, so that makes it harder to figure out what he might not like about it, but he does like lots of things that I don't (like peppers and raw celery) so it seems like it can't be my attitude. I was told not to give him cow's milk "too early" if I was nursing and he mostly drinks water which sometimes has a little juice added for flavor. I wish now I'd thought to give him milk earlier, but when he was nursing everyone told me it was not a big deal. Are there others whose kids won't drink milk? Are you getting flack about it? I'm having another one soon, so if there's some obvious mistake we made, perhaps I can learn from it. I tend to think this is just a personal preference, and that he's probably making up the difference in some way but I can't help worrying about his bones and teeth, especially since it was the only thing the doctor seemed bothered about.

Also, my husband and I are taking bets that the next kid will eat nothing but cheerios and grilled cheese or whatever for the first 5 years of his life not matter what we do. Lightning never strikes twice.
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bigfatsouthernu
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« Reply #3297 on: June 20, 2012, 2:41:47 am »

I say don't worry.  Just find other sources of calcium.  He's an adventuresome eater----the quest for other sources of calcium should be easy.  And it sounds like he is getting plenty of protein.  There are parts of the world where people do not routinely consume dairy, and folks are quite healthy.  No worries!  (I lament the fact that my adventuresome eater started liking crap like grilled cheese and chicken nuggets when she finally got the coveted spot at campus daycare---where they served lunch!  Thankfully she'll tolerate some salmon and hummus  still.)
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tenured_feminist
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« Reply #3298 on: June 20, 2012, 6:41:57 am »

Don't sweat it. He's doing just fine. If your pediatrician's freaking out, the problem is with the pediatrician, who's drunk too much of the USDA kool aid/dairy farmers' association propaganda.

I have a kids' nutrition question about which I should do some googling, but maybe someone here's faced the same issue. Two of my beloved offspring are headed into their sport's major training season. They will have several four-hour practices from 5-9 PM. How and when would you feed 'em up? I already plan to administer chocolate milk after the practices. (They are big milk drinkers!) Assume no snack breaks during practice, and the issues with both are likely to be keeping weight on, maintaining energy sufficient to get through the practices, and providing what they need to build strength.
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dr_backwoods
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« Reply #3299 on: June 20, 2012, 8:25:52 am »

My guys drank milk as toddlers, but with the list of what your toddler eats I really don't think lack of milk is an issue. 


Also, my husband and I are taking bets that the next kid will eat nothing but cheerios and grilled cheese or whatever for the first 5 years of his life not matter what we do. Lightning never strikes twice.

Anecdotal, I know, but both of mine eat a huge variety, and almost always have.

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