September 30, 2016

Volume 63, Issue 05

Top News

The flagship university warns students about a higher incidence at the start of the semester, but they’re already preoccupied with other dangers.

Highlights

Behind the "Professor President," advisers executed an accountability agenda driven by economic worry and national skepticism about the value of college.

The Chronicle Review

Gains in college attainment have been modest over the past eight years. Did the 44th president fail to deliver?

Also In the Issue

The Great Recession forced hundreds of colleges to scramble for cash to pay their bills.

The pope’s encyclical on the environment reinforces the need for liberally educated citizens, a university president says.

Kelsey Martin, who became interested in medicine while in the Peace Corps, says she wants to foster open discussion and fair treatment.

In the news lately over its ties to the Clinton family, Laureate Education seems to be reaping the benefits of a substantially different business model.

How one black alumnus of a majority white university tried to paint a positive but realistic picture for prospective students.

Experts on labor negotiations say other colleges might want to think twice before replacing instructors to pre-empt a faculty strike.

As campus rates of depression and anxiety soar, administrators say they want to make sure students know where to find help on Day 1.

Both faculty members and administrators cite the state’s continuing budget standoff as the primary culprit for the drop in students.

The university, rocked by campus protests last year, has unveiled an ambitious multimillion-dollar plan. Experts say the follow-through will be as important as the rollout.

Many people in higher education are working to make college more accessible and effective. Even some who are succeeding, though, acknowledge that praise and money tend to follow what’s "new" more than what works.

Commentary

Academics could learn a lot from volunteering in a penal institution — about teaching, technology, and the value of a liberal-arts education.

Why is the keynote speech such a train wreck at most academic conferences?