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Administration

The New Cheating Economy

Business is booming right under colleges’ noses. It’s not just papers and assignments anymore. Now it’s the whole course.

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Athletics

The Myth of the Sports Scholarship

Allison Goldblatt and her family believed that her elite status as a swimmer would pay her way at the college of her choice. But they found out the truth.

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Government

A Humbling of Higher Ed

The president-elect's resonant skewering of elites, political correctness, and immigration policy resonates with the country’s longstanding skepticism of academe.

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Government

Trump’s Surprise Victory Sends Shock Through Higher Ed

Donald Trump’s abrasive presidential campaign angered many people in academe. His upset win raises questions about higher education’s place amid a tide of anti-intellectualism.

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Faculty

Citing Safety Concerns, Northwestern U. Bans Tenured 'Gadfly' Professor From Campus

Jacqueline Stevens has been asked to undergo an evaluation of her "fitness for duty" before returning to her position in political science. She says she's being punished for her outspokenness; a colleague says her presence makes him feel unsafe.

Special Reports

Your Daily Briefing, a New Feature for Chronicle Subscribers

We've started a new email, for individual subscribers only, that briefs readers on everything they need to know in higher ed to start the day. Here's a sample.

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Advice

Small Changes in Teaching: The First 5 Minutes of Class

Four quick ways to shift students’ attention from life’s distractions to your course content.

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Government

How Clinton's 'Free College' Could Cause a Cascade of Problems

The Democratic nominee’s proposal might sound great, but it could close many colleges, pressure some flagships, and disappoint students.

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Technology

MIT Dean Takes Leave to Start New University Without Lectures or Classrooms

Christine Ortiz, a dean of graduate education, envisions a new kind of college, built from scratch for today’s needs and with today’s technology.

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Faculty

‘Silly, Sanctimonious Games’: How a Syllabus Sparked a War Between a Professor and His College

When the College of Charleston told Robert T. Dillon that a quote from 1896 wouldn’t cut it as a statement of his course’s learning outcomes, no one was prepared for the mess that ensued.

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Administration

When College Was a Public Good

Why has state support for higher education dwindled as enrollments have grown more diverse?

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Students

When Does a Student-Affairs Official Cross the Line?

In a time of protest and recrimination, balancing the goals of students and an institution can be perilous. The University of Missouri found that out when a student-life administrator turned up in a viral video.

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Faculty

Why Did a UCLA Professor Become a Target of His Enraged Advisee?

William Klug helped a struggling doctoral student when others saw little in the man’s work that was worth salvaging. Mr. Klug’s killing by that student left those who knew the professor baffled.

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Students

Learning From Failure in Student-Success Programs

Three colleges explain what went wrong and how they changed course.

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Administration

Colleges Brace for Impact of Overtime Rule

A change in federal labor law that takes effect in December has institutions scrambling to sort out which salaried employees will be due extra pay if they work more than 40 hours in a week.

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Students

To Improve Student Success, a University Confronts the Email Deluge

Michigan State University is rethinking how it communicates with students, especially those who are freshmen or the first in their families to go to college. Sending hundreds of emails isn’t the best way — but what is?

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The Chronicle Review

Rebuilding the Bachelor's Degree

A credential rooted in the 17th century needs a makeover for the 21st.

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Administration

Trump: The College Years

At Fordham and Penn, the presidential candidate would have studied Islam, seen the first coeds on campus, and skimmed the dull parts.

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Students

Should Everyone Go to College?

For poor kids, "college for all" isn’t the mantra it was meant to be. The national push may be doing more harm than good.