June 12, 2017

Re:Learning at ASU + GSV Summit 2017

This special series from the team of Chronicle reporters who attended the ASU+GSV Summit this year showcases video highlights from some of the key speakers at the annual gathering of educators, tech entrepreneurs, and investors.

The edited segments, hosted by the senior writers Goldie Blumenstyk and Scott Carlson, feature speakers including:

  • Jeremy Bailenson, of Stanford University, highlighting the teaching potential of virtual reality.
  • Ted Dintersmith, an investor and financer of documentary films, contending that schools should give students relevant skills, not just courses to pad a college application.
  • Three experts on education in Finland, sharing some of the surprising approaches that nation takes in education.

See below for those videos and others from the event. For more on educational innovation, explore The Chronicle’s re:Learning project.

From the ASU + GSV Summit 2017: Peter Capelli, a management professor at the University of Pennsylvania, describes how employers have given up on an essential part of the American-labor system: a role in training the next generation of workers.

From the ASU + GSV Summit 2017: Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist at the University of California at San Francisco who studies the effects of games and other physical and cognitive challenges, says they can improve memory and multitasking, and even treat attention-deficit disorders.

From the ASU + GSV Summit 2017: Andrew Ng, a computer scientist and co-founder of Coursera, says innovations in artificial intelligence will both create great wealth and raise ethical challenges if we want not just a wealthier society “but also a fairer society.”

From the ASU + GSV Summit 2017: Ted Dintersmith, an investor and financer of documentary films, argues that schools should give students relevant skills, not just courses to pad a college application.

From the ASU + GSV Summit 2017: A founder of the company behind Angry Birds and two others highlight how the Finish way of promoting creativity in the classroom has paid off.  

From the ASU + GSV Summit 2017: Jeremy Bailenson, a professor at Stanford University and founding director of its Virtual Human Interaction Lab, says the technology, in the right circumstances, can be educationally transformative.